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Full text of "Frances Shimer Quarterly Vol. 3 No. 1"

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1911-1312 




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Jfauras g^ittu* (fuar&rlg 






PUBLISHED BY 
THE FRANCES SHIMER SCHOOL IN MARCH, JUNE, OCTOUEft, AND JANUARY 



olume III Mount Carroll, Illinois, April, i 9 n Number i 



2% Jfranr?* Shimer Srljtml 

of 
QJIfe Utriwrsitg of (Eltlrana 

iBt. (ffarrnll. 311. 



Eater. 



Entered March 31, 1909, at Mt. Carroll, til., ns second-class matter, under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Subscription, price 50 ccdIs » year 



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®f|£ $mna& g>Ijtmer §>t$tmi 

and Jmtuir (Enlbgt for (gtrla 



Dean-s Permanent Address, Mt. Carrou.. Iluno* 

OrriCC WD13RS «N CHICAGO 

mondayi in MtauBT. kkqo-i-mo. >:0O-MQ 
FINE ARTS BUILDING, 203 MICHIGAN AVENUE 

TCLCPHONE MAWBWON 37*0 




DEAN WM. I\ \I, KEE 



C A I- K N h A R F O R 



i 9 i i 



(Culruftar 



AND 



i 9 I 2 



Aprtl I0il-3)uiu, 1012 



May 
|unc 

June 
Tunc 

I uric 
September 



i i 

4 

6 

7 



Thursday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 



member 


3* 


ember 


IS 


January j 


14)12 




January 
February 


*3 


22 


March 


22 


to April 


2 


May 


II 


June 


9 


lunc 


10 


June 


11 


June 


12 



Thursday 

Friday, ;o i\m. 

Tuesday, 8:33 P.M. 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Friday, 3:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, 8:33 p.m. 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 



kder'b Day, HaH-holiday* 

\UKEAJ I 

Akt Reception* Domestic Science Reception, 
sum Day, Concert. 

Commencement. Class Day. 

First Semester Begins, Classes meet at 
2:00 p.m.; buildings ready Tuesday, Sep- 
tember i2 p 1 : 00 p.m. Teachers and pupils 
from East and South leave Chicago in 
eckl car 1:30 p.m., Tuesday. Pupibarc 
not received until the day school opens. 

Thanksgiving; a holiday, one day only. 



Winter Vacation. 

Second Semester Opens, 
Washington's Birthday. 

Spring Vacation. 



Half-holiday. 



Founder's Day. Half-holiday* 
Baccalaureate Service. 
Art Reception. 
Reunion Day, Concert. 
Commencement Exercises* Class Day. 

191 1 







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SEPTEMBER 



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AUGUST 



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DECEMBER 



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33 
jo 



1912 




THE FRANCES SHIMER 



STabte af CJoutntta 




Administration Building 
Admission .... 

Art ..... . 

Buildings and Grounds 
Carnegie Library 
College Courses Offered 
College Hall .... 

Courses Offered (Academic) 
Dearborn Hall 
Diploma and Certificate 
Diveision Club . 
Domestic Science 
Educational Aid Association 
Endowment . 
Expenses 

Expression . . , 
Faculty .... 

General Information 

Golf, Tennis, and Basket-Bail 

Graduates .... 

Hathaway Hall , . . 
Healthfulness 

Honors 

Introductory Department 
Junior College . . . 
Location of Mt Carroll 
Metcalf Hall , . 
Mt. Carroll Seminary . 

Music 

Normal Department 
Physical Culture. . . 
Religious Exercises . . 
Requirements for Graduation 
Rooms and Furnishing 
Self-Help . . . . 
Special Students 
Steam and Power Plant 

Student Organizations 
Students . . . . 
Trustees .... 
University of Chicago 
West Hall . 

Young Women's Christian Association 



14, 



i 
13 

*9 
10 
12 
16 
10 

M 

12 

16,41 

41 
24 

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23 
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16 

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22 

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< 







THE FRANCES SHIMER Sc H O O L 



Uflttr& tff UtUBltSB 



wmctre 



Henry S, Metcalf, 

President 

NATHANIEL Butler, 

Vice-President 



William R McKee, 

Secretary 
George D. Campbell, 

Treasurer 



Mtmbtt* 

Term expires June, 1911 

Hon, A. J, Sawyer, Lincoln, Nebraska 
Harry Pratt Judson, LKD., Hattie N. LePelley, Frecport 

The University of Chicago J, H. Miles, Ml Carroll 

Thomas W. Goodsfeed, D.D,, The University of Chicago 

Term expires June, IQ12 

Mrs. W. R, Hostetter, Mt Carroll George D, Campbell, Mt Carroll 

Henry S. Metcalf, M.D., Mt, Carroll William P. McKee, Mt, Carroll 

Nathaniel Butler, The University of Chicago 

Term expires June, IQ13 
Mrs. A. T. Dunshee, Mt Carroll John M. Rinewalt, Mt Carroll 

Lathan A. Crandall, D.D,, Minneapolis Wallace Heckman, Chicago 



BBj* (Sammittn on family 

Henry S. Metcalf Whxiam P. McKee 



c A L E N D A R 



FOR 



1911 



AND 



I 9 I 2 



©ffittra of 3Jnatrurtioit attti Afrmmistratimt 

W1111 vm PACKER M(Kv:k s A.M., B.D., Dean and Instructor in History. 

AB Wabash College, 1883; B.D., Baptist Union Theological Seminary, 1887; 
achiate Student in History in University of Minnesota, 1895-97; AM, t Uni- 
versitv'of Minnesota, 1897; B.D., The University of Chicago, 1897; Pastor, Olivet 
Baptist Church, Minneapolis, 18S7-97; Frances Shimer School, 1S97-. 

Elsie Garlanp Hobson, A.M., Lady Principal and Instructor in Latin.* 

* \ B Boston University, 1895; A.M., Boston University, 1896; Graduate Student 
in Latin and Sanskrit, The University of Chicago, 1895-96; Instructor in Greek 
and English, Lewiston (Me.) High School, 1896-97; Instructor in Latin and 
Greek Academy for Young Women, Jacksonville, III., 1897^99; Principal and 
Instructor in Latin, Academy for Young Women, Jacksonville, 1899-1900; Prin- 
cipal and Instructor in Latin, Michigan Seminary', Kalamazoo, Mich., 1900-7; 
Principal and Instructor in Latin, Frances Shimer School, 1907-. 

Florence Turney McKee, Ph.B,, Instructor in Psychology. 

Graduate, Mt. Carroll Seminary, 1894; Instructor, *m, 1894-96; The Univer- 
sityof Chicago, 1S97, 1899-1901; Senior College Scholarship in English, 1900-1; 
Ph.B. The University of Chicago, 1 901; Frances Shimer School, 1 901- 

Elsie Morrison, S3,, Instructor in Science and Mathematics. t 

S.B-, The University of Chicago, 1905; Graduate, Milwaukee State Normal, 1S94; 
Instructor in Mathematics, Wayland Academy, 189S-1900; Assistant Principal, 
Pewaukee High School, 1902-4; Graduate Student, The University of Chicago, 
1905; European travel, 1909; Frances Shimer School, 1905-, 

Angeune Beth Hostetter, Ph.B., Instructor in Latin. 

Graduate, University of Chicago, 1907; Graduate Student, ibid., 1909-10; 
Instructor, Central College, Pelia, la., igoS^; Instructor, Frances Shimer 
School, 1903-4, 1905HS, 1910-. 

Margaret Johnson, Instructor in German and French. 

Syracuse University, 1899-1901; Instructor in French and German, Monticello 
(N.Y,) High School, 1901-4; Instructor in French and German, Township High 
School, Joliet, III, 1904-8; Grenoble University, Grenoble, France, 1908^9; 
Private work under Fraulcin E, Kadelbach, Berlin, 1909; Frances Shimer School, 
3900-. 

Elizabeth Connor, Ph.B., Instructor in English. 

West Dcs Moines High School, 1902; Welieslcy College, 1902-5; Instructor 

in Latin and German, Seymour (Iowa) High School, 1907-9; The University of 

Chicago, 1909-10; Ph.B,, The University of Chicago, 1910. 

* Absent until September, xgix. 

t Acting Lady Principal in Miss Hobson's absence. 




■- 



THE F R A N C E S SHI M E R S C II O 



O L 




ity 



Bertha Ruth Bowman, Instructor in Domestic Science. 

Associate, Lewis Institute, 1S9S; Bradley Polytechnic Institute, 1906-7; Frances 
Shimer School, 1907-. 

Delana Bailey, Secretary to the Dean, Instructor in Normal Department 

and Stenography. 

Graduate, Mt Carroll Seminar}', 1S91; Frances Shimer School, xgoo- 
Mary R, Payne, German and History, 

Graduate, Chrisman High School, 1904; Frances Shimer School, 1905; StUw, 
at The University of Chicago, 1905ns, 190S-9; Instructor in English and Gerran 
in High School at Pan's, 111., 1906-8; Associate in Philosophy at The Universi 
of Chicago, 1908; Frances Shimer School, 1909-. 

Elisabeth Maria Barnes, Instructor in Physical Culture and Elocution 
Graduate, Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, Mass., 1S9S; Columbia 
versity Summer School, New York, 1902; Instructor in Reading and Public 
Speaking, Public Schools, Hartford, Conn., 1900-2; Head of Department of 
Oratory and Physical Culture, and Assistant in English, High School, RockviUe 
Conn., 1902-8; Post-Graduate Student, Emerson College of Oratory, 1910 

Martha Green, Assistant in Mathematics and History. 

Graduate, Peoria High School, 1907; Frances Shimer Junior College, 1910. 

Sly* Stjmrtiflfiifcf of Bubu unb Art 
Emil Liebiwc, Chicago. Visiting Director of Piano Music. (See p. 25 ) 

D0R £ G 'i ^ HT ' T InStmCt0r hl Pian ° and Histor y oi M **ic and Art. 

« of Church Choir,. R„ £ i '%? ^^ 1Y«" «"*. Soloist.aud Dir, 



iare, 
Direct 



or of Church Choirs, Roche er NY V « n- "^ S ° 1 ° !st ' and Dkccl ' 
School for Girls, Rochester N V *' T* DirCCt ° r ° f Music » Hakcs **»* 
brings and P uc blo, Colo \2*'' 'n' V acher ° f Vocal Music > Colorado 
^te Normal School, <&2£^ w" ^^^ Music, Colorado 



IQIO-. 



1910; Frances Shimer School, 



Grace Dunn AB T 

*««■ W, cJ££fifi£F* ™< "I V„ ss ar Map, I9o8 . Slu ,,c„,. 



1909-10. 



8 




FOR 



191 



lUwnF.N, Instructor in Art and China Painting. 
\n Carroll High School, 1891; Student in Musi 

■1-93 




Graduate in Art, Ml. Carroll Seminary, i8o d . SS^o ' ^ Cmi " 
rinstitute Of Chicago xqoi, xooa, and ,904; I&S^tapS"* 



\ jgj Prances Shimer School, 1898- 



ivate 



* * * * * 
D.B.. The Univcrsitv 



of Chicago. Special 



PEACOCK, 
« in Sociology. 
_ j t G. Allen, house mother. 

I Buildings and Grounds. 

, Mkrrick J 
g^ zer Housekeepers. 

"■" v Mmdtmi 

Mt Carroll is situated on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul Railway, 

S miles (three trains each way daily, to and from Chicago, three hours by the 
Latest train) immediately west of Chicago on the Omaha division of this line, 
t is 150 miles southwest of Milwaukee on the Racine & Rock Island division. 
Two transcontinental trains, including the famous "San Francisco Overland 
Limited/' to and from Chicago and San Francisco and Los Angeles, pass through 
Mt. Canoil daily, stopping to let off sleeping-car passengers from distant points. 
Express trains, likewise, between Chicago and Denver, Omaha, Sioux City, 
Chamberlain, Sioux Falls and Rapid City (South Dakota), St Paul, Minneapolis, 
Kansas City, Ottumwa, Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Marion, and intervening 
points, pass through Mt- Carroll daily, furnishing fine facilities for transportation. 
Particular attention is invited to the fact that passengers from the numerous 
places on the lines of the St. Paul and Union Pacific roads can reach Mt Carroll 
without any cltange 0} cars wJtatever^ there being, in the case of many of these 
points, three trains a day. 

The railway company, on request, adds a special car for the exclusive use 

of our pupils and teachers to the train leaving Chicago at 1:30 p.m. on the after- 

on before the opening of school in September, and at 5 : 15 p.m. in January. 

The town is ten miles from the Mississippi River, beautifully located among 

uresque hills, and is justly celebrated for its beauty and healthfulness. The 

stands on high ground, and overlooks a landscape rich and varied. The 

moI grounds consist of twenty-five acres, a large part of which is protected and 

I by many majestic old pine, maple, and elm trees. Orchards furnish 

' tO* ° f frUitSj and a kitchen & arcien supplies the table with fresh vege- 
fi city water supply used by the School is obtained from an artesian 
« deep. The Jersey milk furnished the School table is pure. 

9 










WEST HALL, COLLEGE HALL, WEST HALL ENTRANCE, POINT ROCK (IN THE 

PARK), RAILWAY STATION 



Th main object at which the School aims is to fit its pupils for life- to secure 
me trained intellect, the refined sensibilities, the self-controlled will, the enjight- 
7ed conscience which together make a noble and symmetrical womanhood. 
It is a preparatory school, but it is far more than that 

The pupils are brought into constant contact with teachers of culture, refine- 
ment and experience, who know how to meet the needs of young girls, and who 
enter sympathetically into their work and play. The appeal is made to the best 
in a girl; and results show that in most cases the appeal is successful. A series 
of yeare'in such a school, or even a single year in some cases, will deeply and 
favorably affect th& whole tenor of a girl's life. 

Cliaracter. — Every applicant for admission must present a written statement 
of recent date, from pastor or teacher, giving assurance that she is in every way 
a suitable person to be a member of a home school for girls. 

It is confidendy believed that no better equipped home is offered its patrons 
by any school for girls in the West. The School has the advantage of fifty-seven 
years of history, experience, and traditions; yet its equipment is entirely new. 
It has been rebuilt and enlarged since 1903. The buildings, solidly constructed 
of brick and stone, are heated by steam, lighted by electricity, and furnished with 
hard and soft water and all modem conveniences. 

ffinllrgp Barmitnni ana Sfrrpttmi ^all 

April 15, 1909, the Trustees let the contract for a new college dormitory and 
reception hall for the use of the whole school, ready September 8. 

This brick and stone building is modified colonial, 90X40. three stories 
with basement and attic. The trimmings are Bedford stone. The front terrace! 
sixty feet long and nineteen feet wide, with a railing and baluster, is of stone and 
concrete 

diniL h rc!r^v°° r C °?; nS " kUchen f ° r preparin S °S ht refreshments. The 
bS ZS T h 5^' iS finished missio » -W with pilasters, drop 
S XeS^' " raH ' PlatC rai '' COrnke m ° !din e> ™ d triple French 
-e tS i„ K h n a , 'T* u ^^ ^ main ha " ™™* «A across 
with St2td P waSf )P bCa,m ' hirgC *"** Wilh *** "** «**V 
on the ground 00 r r ng : COlUinUed t0 Uie *™ d fl «* The main feature 
The southern cxJ' , T^' 4 ° X39 ' bn,keD * Corinthian columns. 

^ -lis a„S if ""* *» *" ** «*»*»" -th window sea*. 

fe". appropriate designs and Tiffany effect. 



to 



C A L EN PAR 



FOR 



19x1 



AND 



1 9 1 2 



The second and third floors contain toilet rooms, with eight single rooms and 
fifteen double rooms for teachers and pupils. All double rooms have two windows 
am l two closets. The finish on the upper floors is dark-brown stain. The 
building has Tungsten llolophane electric light, steam heat, and elevator for 
trunks. The basement has hot-water heater. The building'is connected with 
the central steam-heating plant and with the sewer system. Every room has 
sunshine. 

This building is intended to care for the maturer pupils in the College Depart- 
ment and to furnish social facilities for the use of the whole school, 

iflrtrulf ^alt 

The recitation rooms in Metcalf Hall, to which Andrew Carnegie contributed 
$10,000, were first used January 11, 1908; the auditorium, January 17. The 
building is 107X44 feet* native stone and sand-mold brick; two stories and 
mezzanine story, with tower and finial 100 feet high. The building contains 
offices, library, cloak rooms, ten recitation rooms, and auditorium seating over 
four hundred. The interior wood has cathedral oak and bog oak finish. 
The electric light system embodies the latest designs in Holophane shades and 
Tungsten lamps, distributed evenly over the ceilings, lighting perfecdy every part 
of the building. The heat is from the central steam and power plant. The 
tower contains the old bell used by Mrs. Shimer for more than thirty years. 

The building is named in honor of Mrs. Sarah Metcalf, a lifelong friend 
of the School, whose son Henry is now president of the Board of Trustees* 

Wnrt Salt 

West Hall, occupied September 11, 1906, designed by Architect C. A. Eck- 
storm, Chicago, 154X40, is a perfectly equipped home for over fifty people, in 
addition to reception rooms, parlors, dining-room, and Dean's apartments. On 
the ground floor are pupils' parlor, pupils' kitchen, Young Women's Christian 
Association rooms, dining-room, serving- room, and kitchen — all built on most 
approved modern plans. A studio of artistic design is on the upper floor. Stand- 
pipe, with hose on each floor, and fire escape are provided, with ample stairways 
in addition. Bathrooms are on the first and second floors, 

A central steam plant, with steam laundry connected, equipped with modern 
machinery, was erected in 1906, In 1909 the plant was further improved by 
the addition of one 87-horse-power high-pressure boiler and a Jones Underfeed 
Stoker, giving a smokeless stack though using soft coal screenings, effecting 
great economy and high efficiency. The Trustees contemplate the erection of 
an entirely new brick building in the summer of 191 1, 56XS0 feet, and the 
installation of a duplicate boiler and stoker to provide heat and power and 
laundry capacity ample for the further development of the School, at an expense 
approximating $io,ooo. 

n 




CARNEGIE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
GLIMPSES OF FIVE BUILDINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 

WEST HALL 




S H I M E R 



SCHOOL 



Hhitijamuij Jfall 
Hathaway Hal], dedicated in November, 1905, was named for Mrs. Mary 
L Hathaway Corbett, of the class of 1869, a sister of Mrs. Hattie N. LePelley, 
of Fieeport, a trustee of the School, who gave liberally toward the erection and 
furnishing of the building. " The basement contains a modern gymnasium 70X36 
feet besides three shower-baths set in marble partitions, lockers, and all other 
necessary fixtures. The three upper floors contain parlor, rooms for fifty pupils, 
baths, and trunk-room. The parlor has been furnished by the Mount Carroll 
Seminary and Frances Shinier School Association of Chicago. In 1910 the 
residents of Hathaway, assisted by outside friends, added to the beauty of the 
interior by gifts of pictures and furniture. No detail has been omitted which 
would contribute toward making the building a thoroughly modern and com- 
fortable home. Adequate fire protection is secured by a stand-pipe, with hose 
connections on each floor, and fire escapes on each end, in addition to broad 
easy stairs. The hall was designed by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, Chicago. 

Srarborn B?ull 
The building for Instrumental and Vocal Music, and Domestic Science 
was completed and opened for use in November, 1903. It is solidly constructed 
of brick and contains eleven practice-rooms, two rooms for instruction in piano 
and voice, sewing-room, kitchen, pantry, dumb-waiter, together with hall of gener- 
ous size, and basement complete under the whole building. The building was 
designed by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, of Boston and Chicago. The steam- 
heat plant is connected with the boilers in the central heating plant The 

dC^cITm for f Mr5 ' IsaW Dearbom *-»■ ! °™ l y *«■ °<™ 

department of Music for over twenty years 

»ta£n£ g? *!L deStr ° yed the ° Id huiMi «& and S °»* Hall. While the 

-S^ Scs^Sf the Sch ° o1 in rcplacing these 

*^£tt?£i ° mda,S ? thC Sch ° 01 ' **" Can.egie offened, in 
^^^S£S^3S l0 .J uDd a frce ^ ^rary for Mt Carrol, if 
™* library i s nTfc^ "V? ^^ by *»*» * ^™* <«"<■ 
Proper chaperonage. ' PUpUs have free access to its privileges under 

Elrrlrir (Cloth 



\u 1 •■ ,. murine iLUirlt 

Programaock 88 %$^** *"** ^ rung automatically by a Frick 
«* «» institution hS^ST- mC "^ l,nihim,i[V 0f P^- through- 
^*^«d.«2? t %?* a ° m *. ******* as well as in hours for 
<ir >' docks in other building "'^ dock also «■»««* • astern of second- 



12 



C A L E N D A R F O R i 9 i T 



AND 



912 



iSiifrtnqj 

The School, founded in 1853, and known for forty-three years as Mt 
Carroll Seminary, became, in 1896, by the wish of the founder, Mrs F A W 
Shinier, an affiliated school of the University of Chicago. After much considera- 
tion between President Wm, R. Harper and Mrs. Shimer it was decided that a 
separate Board of Trustees should be organized to take charge of the School 
The Board consists of fifteen members, representing the University o£ Chicago' 
the alumnae of the Seminary, and the citizens of Mt. Carroll. 

The relation of the Frances Shimer School to the University of Chicago is a 
double one, In the first place, it is an affiliated School of the University, and 
as such, the work of instruction is under the direct oversight of the University! 
In the second place, four of the fifteen Trustees are officials of the University! 
While, therefore, it sustains a relation to the University so intimate as to justify 
its name, it is an independent institution and seeks a constituency of its own. 

The hundreds of graduates and pupils of Mt. Carroll Seminary are included 
as graduates and pupils of the School and the large constituency gained in 
over half a century furnishes a constant source of support, advancing its best 
interests. 



Ettbmmttfttt 

At her decease, Mrs. F. A. W. Shinier left the bulk of her property in trust 
for the benefit of the School. The property consists of money and real estate, 
chiefly in Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, and Florida. 

In addition to this, Miss Adelia C. Joy, for twenty years Lady Principal of Mt 
Carroll Seminary, who died in October, 1903, in Davenport, Ia. ( left bequests to 
the School and to the Educational Aid Association. The last is for the benefit 
of pupils in the School who are worthy and who need financial help. 



AfrmiBsimt 

No student need hesitate about coming to the School through fear of being 
excluded by the entrance examinations. The Introductory Year furnishes an 
opportunity to make up deficiencies. Students will be admitted to advanced 
classes on presenting written statements from instructors giving detailed account 

work done, or from examination showing their qualifications to carry on the 
work of these classes with success. Vacation work will be credited only on 
examination. Every pupil must enter a class in spelling or satisfy the 
instructor in English that it is unnecessary. 

*3 






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i 







PARTS OF MKTCALK. IIATHAWAV, COLLEGE, AND WEST HALLS 
TENNIS COURT, DEARBORN HALL, CANNA BED 




SHIMER SCHOOL 



Afa&mtr Brjtartmrnl 

The courses of study in the Academic Department include the studies neces- 
sary for admission to the best colleges. Each student will pursue such of the 
studies as may be required by the college or university which she desires to enter; 
or, if she prefers, such other work as may be agreed on. 

' In the statements which follow, a unit usually represents an exercise daily 
for the usual school yean In a few of the subjects the recitations occur four times 
a week instead of five. 

Students who complete fifteen units (three of which must be in English, three 
in a language other than English, one in History, two in Mathematics, and one 
in Science), from the list below, will be entitled to the Academic Diploma of 
the Frances Shimer School. 

Physical culture is required of all pupils unless excused by physician's cer- 
tificate. 

Pupils who do not wish to graduate may select such studies as they wish 
subject to the approval of the Dean. 

ftimtnanj uf Antbratr (TruiniPH (gHTrrrfi 
Each pupil is supposed to have four studies. If extras are taken the number 
should be reduced. Strong pupils after the first year may carry an extra course 
in Music, Art, Elocution, or Domestic Science. The recitation periods are forty- 
five minutes long. The figures indicate the number of recitations weekly in each 
subject, Monday is the weekly holiday. 



History 

i. Greece and Rome 

2, General European 

3. United States 
4* English 
5- Biblka] . ' 

Latin: 

1. Foundations of Latin 
( Caesar 

M Prose Composition' based 
I Laesar 

s ' °SW2£g c ° m ^»» 

4' Vergil . ' 

German: 

I. Hierncntary German . 

3- ilurd- Year Germ.* 

French 



Units 
1 



on 



German . 



Element 
Advanced 



For 



college 



curses, see pp. IS , l8 . 



English: rjnits 
(Required for admission to college.) 
Composition, Rhetoric, History 
of English Literature. Books 
required for reading; books re- 
quired for study 3 

Mathematics: 

1. Algebra to Quadratics , , . 1 

2. Algebra from Quadratics . . J 
3- Plane Geometry 1 

Drawing (seven hours a week) . . 1 

Dom es ti € Science t 

i I armony . . 

Science: 

Physics and Chemistry, each 1 

Botany ....". 1 

Biology .... . j 

Elocution* . . 1 



r " Lmt "t fee ;uimi«i 



°n to rhe University of Chi 






1 I 



C A LENDAR FQ R i 9 i j 



AND 



912 



Araitritiir ffiurrtnibmt 

The figures indicate the number of recitations each week. A uni 
turn four *>r five times :i week for the school year. 



ait means a rccita- 



. 



^ 



:ory 
lish 
Latin 



Second Yi,ir 



S Geometry 
5 English 

4 History 

5 J Latin 
German 



a 

"SI 



Algebra 
History 
English 
Latin 



Third Year 



Geometry 

English ' 

History 

Latin 

German 

Physiology 



English 
I tatin 
German 
Adv. Algebra 
Bible 



Fourth Year 



English 

Latin 

German 

Botany 

Bible 



Physics 
Latin 

History 
German or 
French 

Physics 
Latin 

History 
German or 
French 



\ ork required for graduation in italics. Three years in a lavage other than 
aghsh are required also, and one of the two years in Science goffered a&vT 

One unit in mus.c may be secured by taking instruction from the Principal one 
boot a week for two years, practicing one and a half hours a day. For two years' work 
» DomestK Science or Elocution, or for seven hours a week, for one year in Art 
e credit j, given. _ Fifteen units are required for graduation, in addition to the 
mlar work in physical culture. 

The work offered above, if rightly chosen, is ample f or admission to the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Vassar, Wellesley, and other colleges for women, and other 
umversities or colleges East and West. To ascertain the exact requirements 
at each college it is advisable to write to the colleges concerned. It is highly 
desirable that pupils wishing to prepare for college, especially those in the East 
should enter here at least by the second or third year of the Academy 
otherwise they will probably lose a year in preparation for college entrance. 
ihis has been the experience of many girls who spent two or three years in 
schools not on the accredited list of the colleges in question. 

Examinations are held each semester. Reports showing term and examina- 
tion standing are sent to parents on request. Students who have completed these 
eaimnahons ,n the required studies will be admitted to the University of 

ZJu' „ Universities > to Vas ^ Wellesley, Beloit, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, 
and other colleges without examination. 

ye J hC time for g^ation from the Academic Department is usually four 
depa F rt m Ss iUati0n * M ^ C ' **' *** Domestic Science > see P*** S^ 11 to th °se 



15 





HATHAWAY HALL 
DEARBORN HALL 



^r""" SHIMER SCHOOL 

Sl)f IlituiPr ©allege (finurata 

FIRST YEAR 

PERIODS PE« WEEK 

Required: English (may be taken in second year if preferred) . . 4 

Elective: Latin . . - * - 

French 4 

German 4 

Mathematics (Solid Geometry, Trigonometry) ... 4 

History and Political Economy - - 4 

Music a 

Psychology 4 

Physiography . . . ■ 4 

SECOND YEAR 

Elective; Latin ■ 4 

French 4 

German 4 

English . 4 

History and Sociology 4 

Botany or Geology 4 

No student may graduate from the Junior College with less than 28 hours' 
work, an average of 14 each of the two years of the course, nor take more than 
16 hours' work in any one year. (An hour means a recitation four times a 
week throughout the year.) As a rule students are advised to carry four 
studies {never more) each meeting four times a week, making 16 recitation 
periods each week. A diploma will be given at the end of the course. Second- 
year studies may be taken earlier, if desired. 

Students wishing to receive college credit in music must possess as a pre- 
requisite the equivalent of Grades I and II in Calendar, p. 26, The college 
music requires not less than one hour a week of instruction with the head of the 
department, and not less than an hour and a half a day practice. Credit 
*m not be given m practical music without a year in Harmony. For extra charms 
m practice and theory, see "Expenses," p. 36. 

AboiiAaimt hi flp Smitnr QloUrgr 

or fn f exclntf^ ar " ^^ f ° r "*»««• A PupO who has fourteen units 
high schoSXh inSbnCC u thirtCen ' may enter ° n "*«*»■ G»A»tM of 

lik * grade, will letST^IL- ^ and ° &tt un!vereiti ™ ««i colleges of 

animation. " lowanl admission for work done without ex- 

to 



C A 1. K N P A R FOR x 9 x z AND 



i 9 i 2 



14, Eugihih 




Prose Composition 



First semester. 

2t History of English Literature: Assigned readings, arranged chrann 
logically to show the historical development of English literature, with arehi 
reference to important characteristics of each period. This course corresnonrk 
to EDgHsh 40 at the University of Chicago. Required. Second semester 
Mess Connor, 

3< English Literature of the Nineteenth Century: (Second semester 
Mrs, McKee. 

Araifcmir (SoureM 

Entiit 

FIRST SEMESTER 

i 4 Foundations of Latin: Inflections, 

2. Caesar: Gallic War, Book i, 1-29; Book ii 

3. Cicero: Catiline i-iv. Prose Composition. 

4. Vergil: Aeneid, Books i — ill* Collateral reading, 

SECOND SEMESTER 

1. Foundations of Latin: Syntax, Reading, Fabidae Faciles. 

2, Caesar: Gallic War, Books iii, iv; selections from v and vi. Prose Com- 
position. 

4. Cicero: Manilian Law; Archies. Prose Composition, Ovid: Selec- 
tions from Metamorphoses. 

5, Vergil: Aeneid, Books iv-vi. Selections from Books vii-xii. Collateral 
reading and topics, 

(Bnmun 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Elementary German (2): Grammar; Simple Prose (Bacon), Oral repro^ 
duction of stories read. 

Intermediate German: Grammar. Der zerbrochene Krug (Zschokke): 
Das edle Blut (Wildenbruch). 

t Advanced German: Review of grammar. Aus dem Leben ernes Taitge- 
mckts (Eichendorff); German Comedies (Manly and Allen). 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Elementary German: Grammar. Im Vaterland (Bacon). Oral and written 
work m reproduction* 

Intermediate German: Wilkelm Tell (Schiller); VArrabbiata (Heyse). 
hemes throughout the year on subjects selected from the classics read, 
Advanced German: German Composition (Pope); FrauSorge (Sudermann). 
^ignt reading. Themes throughout "the year* Miss Johnson. 

*9 



C A L E N D A R FOR 



i 9 i i 



AND 



12 



SECOND SEMESTER 



lCebra I; Simultaneous Equations- Stwi&i t>^ 1 , ^ 

. _Qu.do.ic Equations; nS^T^tSS, D?„t?„ll fcftS 



Alcebra 

Factors 
Proportion, 

Plane Geometry: Areas of Polygons, Regular Polygons, and Circles All 
work m geometry is accompanied by original demonstrations. 



Payne 



^tHtnrg 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Greek History (i): West, to the death of Alexander. 
Modern History ( 3 ): Robinson, to era of the Reformation 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Roman History (i): West, to the accession of Charlemagne 

Modern History (3): to the twentieth century. 

Notebooks and collateral reading required in all history courses 



Miss Payne 



Miss 



English 

The classics studied in English and the ground covered varies somewhat 
each year; the following represents the general plan of the work in 1900-10 
Pup.ls should come with a thorough knowledge of grammar and the ability to 
spell; one is at a serious disadvantage otherwise. Pupils wishing to enter senior 
English should be able to write with fair freedom and accuracy, and to con- 
struct logical paragraphs and effective sentences in themes on simple subjects- 
also to analyze and grasp the thought of a page of ordinary exposition Not 
records of previous work done, but tests given the first week of school have been 
found to be the most satisfactory method of determining classification Com- 
position and literature receive almost equal attention in all courses, themes being 
required at least once a week, exercises oftener. Wide outside reading is encour- 
aged to the extent, in some courses, of three books of standard fiction travels 
or biography a semester. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Elementary Composition— Literature (i): Bulfiach's Aee of Fable 

77„£ 01 f? SITIO ^T? IiET0RIC (2): Franklin's Autobiography; Hawthorne's 
Bouse of Seven Gables; Baldwin's Speaking and Writing; weekly themes 

on SS?^ 1,1 ^ 1 ™, (3): Macuilay's Johnson; Burke's Speech 
on toncthahon; Macbeth; weekly themes. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

A^?S^f\ C9 ^ OS eI I0 ^ LlTERATl7RE < I > : SUasMarner; Midsummer- 
themes ' g S $kekk Book; Hans ™'s Engfish Composition; weekly 



21 



F R A NCES SHIMER SCHQQ L 

FIRST SElfESTER 

Elementary: Grammar (Eraser and Squair); Reader (Aldrich and Foster). 
Reproduction of easy stories. 

Advanced- Advanced work in Grammar and Composition. La Poudre 
aux Yeiix (Labiche et Martin); La Mare au Diable (Sand). 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Elementary: Grammar and Reader continued. La Tache du Petit Pierre, 
Short themes on material read. 

Advanced: French Cmftpositum (Franfois); Cototnha (M£rim€e); La 
Ckule (Hugo). Themes throughout the yean Miss Johnson. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Physics (4): Millikan and Gale, Laboratory work twice a week. Laws 
of Motion; Pressure in Liquids and in Air; Molecular Motions and Fortes; 
Work and Heat Energy; Magnetism. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Pmsrcs (4): Electricity, Sound, and Light 

Botany (3): Bergen and Davis. A study of the Seedling; Roots f Stems 
Buds Leaves Flower and Fruit; The Morphology, Evolution, and Classifica- 
tion of Plants; Ecology and Economic Botany. The work in botany will be 

- ^ra^cS^?" 1 study of plan,s by the *•* •* 1m «<* 

use mSES^ mtS Hne C ° UrSe ' C0Vering ° nC SCmeSter "* C ™^ 

Bible 

-his" £j IpirSd ?' f UrSe ; ndudeS . a , n 0UtIine stud X of the life of Christ 
Second KmKJllff mS£ * a Speaal Stud r of some of his teachings. 

fSaKjenmlirii 

EIRST SEMESTER 

Algebra I (r\- <iu„„u t , T 
to the. Equation; PosiS 3 nII^" xf ' ^^mentaiy Course. Introduction 
Phcauon, and Division sZttTj^ N ™ ,beis ; Addition, Subtraction, Muki- 

Geometry ( 2 \- lun? Binomials; Graphs. 

Lines and S^^^ J* «■•«*. Plane Geometry. Book I, Parallel 
and Sinular F igures< l ««^, Book II, The Circle; Hook III, Proportion 

"EBRA HI (,\. « 

Of 



30 







« 

3 



THE r— ^J^± ±_ s H l M E R s C H O O L 



n ^ * . 

, ptTTTTORic— Literature (2): Julius Caesar; Joan of Arc 
^tSS^mSa; Idylls of the King; Baldwin's Speaking and WrU- 
^; weekly ^emes. T0Ric LUa!gw 7/ ^ wer< , 

^ E r AT -^^ brief survey of the main periods of English Literature, 
Omits, Lyw*™' * l { Tovett's First View of English Literature, with readings 
SAaffiSS* KS* ' -view of rhetoric, using Herrick and DamoA 
S2^W Mrss CONNOR. 

Bumrfilir &rirnrr 

Cooong (1) and {2); {3) and (4)* 
Sewing (i) and (2); (3) and (*)• 

JJfiQfliral (Bulfur* atio |fuhlir &n*ahtng 

i. Anatomy; Physiology; Hygiene, 

2. Scientific Breathing. 

3. Voice Culture (speaking voice) 

4. Remedial Physical Culture. 

5. Delsarte System, 

6. Lue Study. 

7. Readings; Gesture; Pantomime; Dramatic Art; Shakspere — 

analytically and dramatically. 

While the chief work of the School is with pupils of matuter years, it furnishes 
a home and instruction for pupils in the Eighth Grade. A few pupils under 15 
are in the family, and special provision is made for their care. The classes 
are small, and individual attention is given each pupil. 

formal Ssgiariittttd: 

The Normal Department has been organized primarily to meet the needs of 
to^S 1 Mr t T n8 \ ° nc C ° nsists of those >' oun S wome * wh o wish to prepare 
1 comftrt 7 t0 ]0SC thc iul ***** oi home "fe The School furnishes 
Therrh^l ° f tan * fad «*W constant oversight of health. 

includes a large nurabe^T^ !" Wh0m th ' S de P artment ' s specially intended 
counties who wish to m>J n ' , a " d young women in Carro11 aml adjoining 
from home, S tnemselves ready to teach, but do not wish to go aw 

22 



A L E N D A R FOR 



9 I I 



A N D 



I I 2 



Nnrinal (Bottru* 

FIRST YEAR 

SECOND YEAR 

America History Engusl .Grammar American History American Literature 

Arithmetic Physiology Algebra Class DrJT 

Smging Class Drawing Civi Singitlg S 

Any Kirls or young women who have a desire to teach will find in this depart 
m ent needed mstrucnon and stimulus. Any who are interested are invited to 
address the Dean of the School for fuller information. 

Hiimiinin (Saimir 

To meet the needs of those who desire business training, instruction is Riven 
by a practical teacher of wide experience in Stenography and Typewriting This 
work can be completed in one year with other studies; alone, in less. Touch- 
typewriting is taught; Munson systems of shorthand. 

(Blp ftepattnmit of fexpxtBman 

iJfnjHiral ffiulture 

Every pupil is required to take daily exercise in the open air. In addition 
to this, each pupil is required to have two periods a week in the Gymnasium 
under the regular instructor, in classes. The Gymnasium on the ground floor 
of the new Dormitory extends over a space 89X36 feet with ample light, heat 
and facilities for shower bath. 

The Gymnasium is equipped with wands, Indian clubs, dumb-bells, swing- 
ing rings, chest machines, parallel bars, and piano. Under the regular regime of 
this work, the exercises being adapted to the peculiar needs of the individual 
pupil, physical weaknesses arc corrected, the chest, waist, and limbs are 
strengthened, the carriage is improved, and the physical condition generally is 
given tone and vigor. Frequent talks on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene are 
given. 

The work includes fencing, basket-ball, fancy steps, fancy drills, games, the 
Swedish system of physical culture, running and jumping. 

A golf course of five holes has been laid out on the School grounds The 
course is well kept and is much used. 

The School also sustains facilities for tennis, croquet, basket-ball, and 
>ckey. Skating may be enjoyed on the creek near the School. 

?j«ttg OJipmia-ilirii 

A course in lung gymnastics or scientific breathing is offered, which is helpful 

for throat and chest troubles, and furnishes a foundation for voice work. Proper 

nothing increases lung capacity and increases the resistance of the pupil against 

iy tendencies to disease of the lungs. This is a distinct course, offered as private 

ork to any pupils who care to take it as an extra. 

2 3 




SHIMER SCHOOL 



physical record of each pupil is kept, and the exercises are adapted to the 
needs of the individual The aim is to develop strength, grace, and freedom of 

carriage. 

tlomttot 

FIRST YEAR 

Articulation and Enunciation; Vocal Technique; Evolution of Expression; 
Breathing; Physical Culture; Platform Deportment; Recitals, 

SECOND YEAR 

• Diction; Expressive Voice; Literary Analysis; Prose Forms and Poetic 
Interpretation; Impersonation; Platform Deportment; Personal Develop- 
ment; Shakespeare; Recitals. 

This department is based upon psychological and artistic principles. The 
method of instruction is that of the Emerson College of Oratory, It aims to 
develop in the pupils ease and power in the natural expression of their own thoughts 
and the thoughts of others. It involves culture of the broadest kind, requiring 
intellectual concentration, aesthetic appreciation, and power to control an audience* 
An appreciation of good literary style is gained through the exclusive study of 
work of the best authors. Special stress is laid upon voice and physical culture 
responsive gesture drill, dramatic art, recital work* 

Diploma— Pupils who complete the two-years* course in this department, 
with thirteen units in the academic work (which must include three units of 
English, one unit of history, one-half unit of physiology), will be granted a 
diploma. 

Eumpattr Manure 

_ This department is designed to meet the needs of two classes of students 
viz : (i) Girls who desire a knowledge of the general principles of sewing and 
cookmg and then application to home life; (2) Girls who desire to specialize 
in Domestic Science with the purpose of teaching 

one yeartf^v^" ftff^-™*- units of academic work, including 
one year of physics with laboratory work, in addition to the full course below . 

FIRST YEAR 

Sewing {i and i>\ w-,«^ « • 

*°srh g t^&z&xzss? **** and cutd " g ° f 

of simple „S, S JS™ dljc^f " g °' P"'"™' ™"i»6 fi«*» >»d .-king 
Cooking (i, 2 arif i ,\ ^ , 
7, and utensils! 3h Fundamental principles of cooking, care of labora- 



torv 



Physiology. See Science 

' PnnC1 P Ies of *K Nation of food to health; dietaries. 
24 



i 9 i i 



AND 



CALENDAR FOR 

r - — - v x x n w u x g T a 

Physiological Chemistry. 

Sanitation. Home sanitation: selection nf hm a M; n » -* i - 
ing; ve^ilation; lighting; plumbing. SSLSLSS'KS, ^^ ^ 

Household Decoration and MousEHom A™™™,.,, 
famishing of the home; laundry work. AraimsTHATiON. Care and 

EMERGENCIES. Home nursing and invalid cooking- what to Ho in m 
emergencies, burns, famting, aprains, etc.; rare of the sick ^n«™ J?l f ° n 
food for invalids. Lectures and laboratory. Preparation of proper 

IJXTtLES. Study of materials commonly used; composition and properties 
Teaching Domestic Science, f^f^uls. 



Fall 

Plain Sewing 
Cooking 

Physiology 



Food and Dietetics 
Emergencies 



FIRST YEAR 

Whiter 

Plain Sowing 

Cooking 
( Physiology 
( Drawing 

SECOND YEAR 

{ Food and Dietetics 
} Physiological Chemistry 
Household Decoration 
Household Administration 



Spring 

Dressmaking 

Cooking 

Drawing 



Sanitation 
Textiles 
Teaching D,S, 



Diploma.— ?upi\s who complete the two-years 1 course in this department 
with thirteen units of scholastic work, will be given a diploma, 

Brpartttitttta at Mm\t mb Art 

Ehil Liebling, Visiting Director in Piano 
While air, Liebling's principal attention has been devoted to a large teaching 
clientele he has found time to compose, write magazine articles, lecture on musical 
topics, and engage in frequent concert tours, Bom in Germany, a resident of 
Chicago since 1872, his name has become thoroughly identified with the artistic 
achievements of the city, and he is favorably known and honorably mentioned 
throughout the musical world, Mr. Liebling meets the advanced membeis of the 
Piano Department individually at his quarterly visits; hears them play and dis- 
cusses with them different modes of study, practical phases of musical teaching, 
and al S0 analyzes many forms of composition. The lectures and concerts of Mr, 
tabling, gi veil with the assistance of the members of the faculty of music and 
outside talent at each of his visits, serve to create a musical atmosphere for the 
in 1H k 0rdinarily ^ be en J°> Ted onI y to *c larger cities. The programs 
Mr 1/ IT m0St imp0rtant works of dassical and modern pianoforte literature. 
iebhng also, at each visit, examines the work and progress of each pupil 

25 



1 


TB » ; 


n 


\ 


ilESGHu * 










— 


1» j *~*L*4r 

•ill- 


7 ^ ^ 






^fe: 








-J? ~^h i 


^Jl ^^^to^to^aMB^i- 


S3 1 1 


I ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^p 



2 




SHIMER SCHOOL 



These lectures, concerts, and examinations create a 



and prescribes her studies. 

lively interest in the subject of music and beget enthusiasm among the pupils. 

Mr Liebling also often; an annual gold medal to be awarded to the best 
pianist in the department In igio it was won by Hazel Snuffle, Eaton, Colo. 

The Conservatory of Music, conducted by the Mt Carroll Seminary for many 
years, made for itself an enviable reputation for the thoroughness and artistic 

excellence of its work. 

The work as now done by the School is rigidly graded and carried forward 
systematically as in other branches of study. 

The regular 

$Han*t (EttntBt 

which pupils of average musical ability may, by taking daily lessons and practi- 
cing three or four hours per day, complete in three years, is divided into six grades: 

Grades I and II 

Major and minor scales with corresponding chords and arpeggios and 
finger technics; studies by Duvernoy, Opus 176 and 120; Czerny, Opus 2gp; 
Loeschhorn, Opus 66, Book I; Heller, Opus 47; Lecouppcy, Opus 26; Bach, 
two-part inventions; Sonatinas; easy Sonatas by Mozart, and Beethoven,' 
Opus 4Q, Nos. 1 and 2; also melodious pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Grades III and IV 

Scales continued; chords and arpeggios of the dominant and diminished 
sevenths; studies by Bich], Opus 60 and 66; Loeschhorn, Opus 66 Books 2 
and 3; Czerny, Opus 740; Hasert, Opus 50; Heller, Opus 45 and 46; Bach, 
three-part inventions and French suites; selections from Haendel, Album: 
sonatas continued; Mendelssohn, "Songs without Words"; modem com- 
posers. 

Grades V and VI 

studlfhv rrl° Ubk ^ ds; °^ ve studies and advanced technical work; 
5dl5£^^?°V 0111 ' Gr ^ U - S °* P ™"™V Bach, English suites 
Sdd Sdarri M, ST" ■ ^positions i Weber's works, and pieces by 
geatel, Godard, MacDowell, L.eblmg, Loeschhorn, Chopin, Heiielt, and 

„,i St\ a S t dCnt nUmbGr ° f P ieccs wil1 be given to insure proper 
SlVfnH , C0UISC f ° r graduati0D ^ »**» "fficfcnt wi* 

^ZZ e TTCL^7^ th ' y are f0lmd quaM * - 

ments of music is expected of pupils entering the 



*gular course. Superior advantages, however, are provided for those beginning 

JSSftS!? : n l]w Piai, ° c — m - *■ «* - .he 

totary work requi^fS T? 1* I,i,nn,m - V and My* one year, the 

f Music and Art (see p. 30), the Hist 



A L E N D A R F O 



9 i 



of Musk: one half year, and the following selerHnno , , 

Ifodcta G-minor concerto or e q ii t" 'r' -Concerto; 

Bach fugues; two groups of smaller solos The SrhrTi Tf S ° nataS; two 

the officers of the School and Emil Liebling fa ma** a» ^ Signcd by 

For those who desire to continue in £ ScS u ^^T® fa Pia ™- 

greater degree of attainment, two courses ^tJZ^?5Z£?* 

Grade VII 
(advanced course) 
Czerny, School of the Virtuoso: Kullak Ortm^^^r *. , 
Seeling, Foote, and Mosche.es; i£K? SffiStS^*! fe*"*-, 
certo in D minor, Mozart, and in C major Beetwin . « ' • - Gne 8J c <>n~ 
Retaecke, Liszt, Rubinstein, Schumann^iSg D^m^ ^T by * aff < 
thoven's more important sonatas. fe > ^eoussy, and others; Bee- 

Grade VIII 
(medal course) 
Includes the work of the previous seven grades and 

Opia^ffi^^ Rubinstein 

Beethoven, sonatas Opus 53 and 57; Sch,ImT , t^ta SS^ta gSf* 
Choprn s larger works, and modern works of artistic mwTand^orW 

(This course requires a year to complete ) 

A demonstrative recital given before the School is required of each gradu 
ate m eack course, the programme as far as possible being memorized 

Uoral <3mtra* 

The first and most important consideration in voice-building is the establish 
«tf correct breathing. This fact will be emphasis *.£££££ 

tihtfliit* af Uoral Ohrarat 

i«/t^'T ^f"- 8 ""*"* '•-• «™ production; exercises in breath- 
r^, g menB ° f n< " atl0n ' ™ rcte ! " «-"-*» and solfeggio; si g h t . 

vJ'ZZfZ't ^"- E -^« h vocalization and solfeggio con.in. 

*w£lSS££2: Marchesi - and othets are «* arias »• ™«-" 

^\rS»f ™T7-? re dimcu,t studics in phrasiD8 and ^™™; 

riaing a „ JZ ?' k "'f' 1 *" 61 ' 1 ' etc -> at te s > me <ime building and memo- 
re f*™'« of church, concert, and operatic music. 



THE 



FRANCE S S H I M E R SCHOOL 



Srqiiiremftito fur <Sra&uatiatt 

A knowledge of the best songs of the modem German, French, and English 
composers; the most noted songs from Schubert, Schumann, and Franz. 
Arias from the standard oratorios. 
Arias from the standard operas. 

Anthology of Italian songs of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, 
A knowledge of piano music, equal to the first and second grade of the Piano 

Course. 

Harmony and Music History. The course in Harmony extends over one 
year, four lessons a week. The course in Music History extends throughout 
one-half year, four lessons a week. Required literary work (see p. 30). 

For those satisfactorily completing the regular course and desiring to be more 
proficient, an advanced course has been arranged. 

AMuiiirrft (Entire* 

The continuation of first course, with more finish and breadth of style. 

Greater familiarity with the standard operas and oratorios. 

Bordogni's 36 Vocalises, Books I, II. 

Exercises, studies, and pieces of noted difficulty. 

Proficiency in sight-singing. 

A knowledge of piano music equal to third grade. 

The final examination will include the rendering of a recital programme 
memorized, 

Jluhlir-Srlrnnl flSimir 
This department offers an opportunity for comprehensive study of the Theory 
and Practice of Public-School Music, to those who desire to prepare for super- 
vising music in the public schools, and for grade teacher who wish to better 
the music in the individual grade. 

FIRST YEAR 

1. Notation. Ear training, 

*. Outline of systematic work for each grade, 

3- Presentation of the Rote Song 

■«Wi?jS£ PreSentati ° n aJdc - l0 P™t of the different rhythmic and 

5- High-school chorus and glee clubs. 

t M„A . / SECOND YEAR 

i- Methods (continued) 

*■ Study of Child Voice. 

3- Art of Con dueling 

4. Relation of superior to the grade teacher. 

28 



ALENDAR FOR 



i o I I 



AND 



12 



5. Continuous practice work throughout the year in the public schools of 
the city under the direct supervision of the critic teacher. 

Music History, Harmony, and one year of Voice will be required for a 
diploma from this department, along with scholastic work required for gradua- 
tion in Piano. 

Blalbi 
First Grade— Elementary studies in fingering and bowing: Dancla De 
Beriot, David, Herman. Studies in first position by Sitt, Wohlfahrt, and Ka'yser 
Book I. Easy solos and duets in first position. 

Second Grade— More advanced studies in fingering and bowing: Kayser 
Book II. The easier positions, Blumenstengel, De Beriot, etc. Scales in one 
and two octaves and studies in shifting, Sitt, Schradieck, Dancla. Pieces in the 
easier positions. 

Third Grade— Scales and chord studies in two octaves, exercises in double 
stopping, solos and duets in higher positions: Kayser, Book III, Schradieck, 
Gruenberg, Pleyel. 

Fourth Grade— Scales and chord studies in three octaves, advanced exercises 
in bowing and double stopping, Kreutzer Etudes, concertos, pieces, and duets, 
using the higher positions, harmonics and double stops: Pleyel, De Beriot' 
Dancla, Accolay, Viotti, Schradieck, Alard, etc. 

Advanced work in addition will be offered to pupils who are ready for it. 
: or additional requirements for graduation, see next page. 

Bfpartmptit of Art 

QLantBts fn Art 

Pupils are not received for less than three hours a week. 

First Year.— Charcoal drawings from objects and from casts. Painting from 
still-life. Sketching in pencil and charcoal from nature. Exercise in composition. 

Second Year — Cast drawing of foreshortened heads, and of figures, in char- 
coal and crayon. Pen-and-ink drawing. Painting from still-life, in oil and 
water-colors. Sketching from nature, in various materials. Perspective and 
anatomy. Modeling in clay. 

Third Year— Drawing from the more difficult antique casts and from life. 
Painting in water-colors and oil, from still-life and flowers, and out-of-doors. 

Fourth Year.— Painting of flowers, in the various materials and from nature; 
of the head and draped model, from life. 

JViUmnrrii l£ 11 11 rue 

Those who have completed the regular course and desire to continue are 
given a year of advanced work. 

'"pi 

ne course consists of original studies from nature, in any material used in 

29 




w 



& 



V 









' ■■~ 




T H E FRANCES S H I M E R SCHOOL 

th School These are expected to show the pupils' ideas of composition in form 
and colon They are to be landscape, portrait, full-figure, and still-life. 

This course is expected to need three hours' instruction daily in the studio. 

China painting is offered as an elective to such pupils as desire it, 

Equipment 

New casts are being added to the studio from time to time, 

feifiiirri litrraru HUirh for (Sraftualra ftt H&uBit ana Art 
Common English Branches 

French, German, or Latin . . 2 units 

History 2 units 

Rhetoric and Composition and Literature . . s . 3 units 

Physiology \ unit 

History of Music or Art ,...,. £ unit 

Elective Scholastic Work 4 units 

Pupils of mature years may be allowed to offer substitutes for the required 
literary 7 work. Diplomas are granted pupils who complete the courses in Music 
or Art, as well as to graduates from the Scholastic Department, Certificates 
may be given when the work in the special department is complete, but the 
required scholastic work is deficient. 

Pupils not desiring to graduate may take music or art or other studies as they 
wish, subject to the approval of the Dean. 

Programs of Departments of Music and of Expression are given below. 

&mtal0 ttg Emit Kfebling 

October i2j iqio 

PROGRAM 

Moonlight Sonata, opus 27, No. 2 

EitlL LlEBLING 

Allegro Appassionato, opus 70 . 



Polon; 



use, opus 14 



L'fitfi (Summer) . 
Romance, 2d Concerto 

man Dances for four hands 
Magic Song 



Emxl Libbling 

-Miss II 

Miss im 
Mksi Knight and Mr. Liebu 



KG 



tOWAM 
3o 



Bccih 

Saint-Sams 
Rubinstein 

Ckamincdt 

niawski 
fieri k,- 

\feya litimund 



CALEND A R FOR 



i 9 i i 



A N D 



(a) Melodic 

(b) Mazur 



Miss Dukn 



Lolita, opus 39 x 

Scherzo, opus 40 t 

Florence Valse dc Concert ) • . . . 

Emil Liebuxg 

Friday, January s? f I p Il 

ASSISTING ARTISTS 

Miss Edna A, Howard 

Miss Grace Draw * 

Miss Dora G, Knight . " ' 

Giga con Variazioni, opus 91 

Emil Liebling 
First Movement from Sonata, opus 24 f or Violin and Piano 

Miss Dunn and Mr. Liebling 
My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice (Samson and Delilah) . 

Miss Howard 
Polonaise, opus 53 for Two Pianos 

Miss Knight and Mr. Liebling 
Canzonetta . 



XT Miss Dunn 

Nocturne, opus 15, No. 1 J 

Scherzo, opus 30 ) 

Mr. Liebling 
Where the Abana Flows \ 

How Many a Weary Caravan / From the Cycle, 

Miss Howard 
*>nd Hungarian Rhapsody for Two Pianos 

Miss Knight and Mr. Leiblxng 



ft&ziinl Programs 

ilniyraiu 

Sibyl Saatmis MacDerhid 

Tuesday, November i t jpio 



1 91 2 

Oh Bull 
Mlynarski 



Emil Lulling 



Vocaliste 
Violinists 

Pianiste 

; . Raff 

Beethoven 

Saint-Saens 

Chopin 

D y Ambrosio 

. Chopin 



Woodford-Finden 



Liszt 



»• Mcin glaubiges Herz 

2 - (a) Fcldeinsamkcit . * Bach 

ft) Vcrgebliches Standchen Brahms 

3- Recitative and Aria from Faust-Jewel Song \ \ ] [ [ \ \ %£% 

3 1 



C A L E N PAR FOR 1911 AND 1 9 1 2 

intuitu" ISrrital 
Monday f-lveuhts*, December 12, igto 

The Daily Question Meyer-Edmund 

Miss Nona Hakes 

Vftlse Aragonaise , m Thome 

Miss Holbert 

Sing, Smite, Slumber Gounod 

Miss Vesta Martin 

Study WoUmhaupt 

Miss Englbbeecbt 

The Irish Folk Song , . . p ooie 

Miss Asckenbrenner 

La Cinquantaine Gabriel-Marie 

Theodore Miles 

Aria from Faust: Lovely Flowers, I Pray Gounod 

Miss Wolz 
The Eagle \ 

From a German Forest > , MacDowell 

Winter ) 

Miss Willard 

Birds in the High Hall Garden Somervillc 

Mr. Hissem 

Introduction and Rondo . . ■ . , Kalkbremier 

Miss Martin 

The Nightingale's Song ......... Nevin 

Miss Erbe 

Etude de Concert MacDawett 

Miss Boyd 

Krritai by Ujt iflumr Ifarultu 
February 26 1 igu 

Edna A. Howard Soprano 

Grace Dunk Violinisle 

Dora G. Knight Pianiste 

Romance . . , . . . Svendsen 

Miss Dunn 

Three Preludes Chopin 

Miss Knight 
Jerusalem, from St. Paul Mendelssohn 

Miss Howard 

33 



FRANC E S SH1MER SCHOOL 



THE 

"" ..... PaladUhe 

4. (a) Psyche . . ; * • - ^^ 

(b) Jedemande a loiscau ■ j 

s . (a) Lit ttber mein Haupt dein schwarzcs Haar Sjrauj^ 

(b) Zueignung . • 

6. Song Cycle (new) 

g?* ) ifacZkr** 

(6) Hope S 

(c) Charity ' 

7 . (a) Why I Love You MacFadyen 

(b) The Nightingale Stephem 

(c) Thou Art My Rest *»** 

(rf) Oh, for a Day of Spring Andrews 

Miss Irene Francis at the piano 

fflnnr tvt fan; <gl* r (Blub 

Monday Evening, December 5, Jpia 

Pantomime Dance Baints 

Magnolia Blossoms . Sherwood 

Orchestra 

In Our Boat Cowen 

Girls of Seville . , Denza 

Chorus of 48 Voices 

Three-part Songs (Ye Banks and Braes 

Old Scotch Ballads \ Comin' thro 1 the Rye 

Miss Wolz, Miss Hakes, Mrss Bora, Miss Erbe, Miss Martin, 
Miss Willard, Miss Newcome, Miss Comerford, 
Miss Aschknbrekner 

Group of Songs from the Rose Songs ........ Jessie L. Gaynor 

(a) If I Knew 

(b) Because She Kissed It 

(c) My True Lover Gave Me a Red, Red Rose 

Miss Laura Wolz 

Five Lktfe Japanese Songs Amy Woodford-Finden 

1. Yo San . . * ,; 

- «« M4i , Double quartette 

-When the Almond Blossoms Fall jL Erbe 

3- Utile Dove . _ . . 

4- 1 Sometimes Wonder ' ' ' " Double quartette 

S. There Are Maidens in Japan M„ s hrbe 

M 1!? B M M « WULZ ' M ' SS B ° YD > AhSS C0.CEM08D; M, SS 

Blue H TT: VKES ' "* WmjUtD « MlSS AWMmfflM, 

Wue Danube Wall zes 

' ■ Strauss, arranged by Spicker 

Frances Shimcr School Song CHO * US 

SUNO BY Tin; Kniikk SCHOOL 

33 




X 



u 




T ti & r *• ** " v " w 

Duo ffciwrf/ 

Valse Mignonne Schuett 

Miss Knight 

Lettre d 'amour Cut 

Menuett in G Beethoven 

Andante religioso .._„.. Tltomt 

Miss Dunn 

My Redeemer and My Lord, from The Golden Legend g uc ^ 

Miss Howajrd 




flflJttdtf 

Names of pupils who secured an average of So or more {of term grade and examina- 
tion gTade combined) in scholastic work (academic and college — not grade work) for 
the semester ending January 24, 1911, The examination papers in all classes in 
which these grades were secured were corrected by readers at the University of Chicago 
In making the average, the term grade and examination grade are given equal weight* 
Delia Asclienbrenner 
Bernice Ayres 
Ruth Baume 



Jessie Beers 
Marie Berlin 
Iotia Bickethaupt 

Agnes Blackmore 
Jeanne Boyd 
Julia Brittain 
Ivy Caldwell 
Mable Chester 
Hazel Cooper 

Ruth Countryman 
Hi.'len Crane 
Catherine Creager 
Dorothy Creager 
Mable Dougherty 
Erusic Elliott 
Gladys Feeder 
Mabel! Felkncr 

M aigaret Gaga 
Laurel GiUogly 

Tr, ''if Grain 



Algebra 1 — 95 

Advanced Algebra— 87 J; German 1—80 

Plane Geometry— 82}; French 1—92^ Caesar-87*- 

English 3—82} 
Algebra 1 — So 
German 3 — 8y% 

Political Economy-S 2 J; German 3 -S 7 i; Psychology 

Bible — 00 

Political Economy— 82^ 

Physiography-82*; German 3-S5; College Latin-S 7 i 

Physics-92i; Psychology— Sa 

Physics— 92}; Psychology— 82 

i^ty^r Domestic Science^; 2d year Domcstic Sdcncc 

Algebra i— So 

1st year Domestic Science— Si 
Algebra 1—87 J 

Vergil— 80' 

French 1—85 

-^J Domestic Sci c „, e -86; ,,! vear Domestic Scte.ce 

s 7v? t7 82 * : P ° UtSl unny-8% 

"t year Domestic Science— a, v , ' 

ouence— 83. English 1—87} 

34 



,uu 



V L E N D A R F O R i 9 i z 



AND 



191a 



Helen Gregory 
Carolyn Green 
Inn Grimi 

Marie Hakes 
jui Hakes 
Basel Hayden 
Charm ion Holbert 
Eldonna Johnson 

Irene Johnson 
Ella Jones 
Marianne Kinkade 
Doris Letch 
Laura Lovald 
Vesta Martin 
Mary Emily Mcrriu 
Margaret Middlekauf 
Lucile Nay 

Edna Olaison 
Amy Opdycke 
Mabel Perdv&l 
Sophia Pool 
Eva Roberts 
Frances Roberts 
Hazel Rollins 
Miriam Sampson 
Winifred Seeger 
Gertrude Shaw 
IsabeUe Shirk 
Gladys Smith 
Julia Sword 

Marion Threshie 

Maude Titton 
Marjorie Wbiffen 
Lillian WMtmore 

Elva Willard 
Laura Wblz 



rman 1 -80; English 3—824 

Algebra 1 — 92J 

Trigonometry-^; Bibfe-^ S ; Psychology-^ 

German 1 — 85 

German 1 — S$ 

Physiography—go; Domestic Science 2— So 
Latin 1—80 

Ancient iri st ory-S 7 J; Plane Gcometry-S2i; French r 
— 85; Bible— S 7 J fl CnCh l 

English a — 82J 
Domestic Science 1 — Si 

Domestic Science 1— S 7 §; Domestic Science 2-86* 

Plane Geometry — S2J J 

English 2 — 80 

Harmony — 924 

Bible — 90; Cicero— 87J 

Domestic Science — 80 

Advanced Algebra— 8 7 Jj Domestic Science 1-S3; German 
— So 

Plane Geometry— 92$; German 1 — g 2 J 
German 1 — 85 

Domestic Science 1— 91J; Domestic Science a— 86 

French 2— So; English 2—82$ 

Trigonometry— 90; Political Economy— 85 

French 2—82-}; Bible— 85 

Domestic Science r— 82; Domestic Science 2— So 

Plane Geometry— 85; French 1— 8?i; English 2— 82* 

Physics— 80; Ancient History— 85 

Algebra 1—90; Latin 1— S5 

Algebra 1 — 95-j 

English 2 — So 

Ancient History— <jo; Political Economy— 82$; French 1 

Domestic Science 1—83$; Plane Geometry— 85; German 

i-8 7 i 
Advanced Algebra— 92^; Cicero— S 7 £ 
English 1—80 

Political Economy— So; Psychology— 83 h College English 

— 82* 
English 2— 82J 
Bible— 85 



35 



F R A NCES S H I M E R SCHQQ L 

flHjarjjrd fur iifr Ifrljmil tjtar 
Home and tuition for the year, including board, room (with 
roommate), heat, electric light, washing of fourteen plain 
pieces of laundry a week, free admission to all lectures, ren- 
tals, and entertainments given by the School, regular gym- 
nastic work, chorus class, class drawing, and tuition in four 
studies in all branches except as noted below under "Extra 
Expenses." Of this amount $200 | s payable September 

13, and $200 January 3 $400.00 

If no scholastic work is taken 370.00 

Day pupils, four studies or less , , 50.00 

Each study over four 15.00 



Extra ExpnuiFB fur &rf|nol Urar 
Room alone, 15% 6o ^ 

Piano lessons, principal, 3 lessons a week, each one quarter- 
hour long, §60; four, SSo; five too. 00 

Piano lessons, principal, in classes of three, two half-hour 
lessons a week, for each pupil 

«. , , ^ * - 3O.OO 

Piano lessons, assistants 

,, , , _ _ 50 or 7^ 

Vocal lessons, three lessons a week, each one-quarter of an hour 

long, $60; four, $8o; five 100 00 

Public-school music in classes of five, two three-quarter hour 

lessons a week, for the first year , 
Second year, same as first year, with the addition of practice 

work under critic teacher 
Lessons in harmony and analysis, four three- quarter hour' 

l«on, a week, three or more in class, for the year . 7 o oo 

Use of piano one hour a day ' 

Extra hours. . IO -°° 

Lessons on violin, $60 to 7 ■ 5° 

Use of roomer practice on 'violin, one hour daily ' ' " * T°° 

^* £?£"** charooaI ' ~ ^ ^ — 

as above, per hour ^ * Week m Art > 

v^^SaSSS & bourj oneIe830Ba 

Lessons in dom. ..,„.,. ••-... 45.00 

Graduationfee . spriag wartlons ... s-OQ 

36* S '°° 



CALENDAR FOR x 9 1 3 



A N I ) 



1 9 1 2 



No pupil is received for less than eighteen weeks. School bills are payable 
one-half September 13, balance January 3, 

1, It is understood that all house pupils enter for the year, unless written 
arrangements to the contrary are made on entering. Pupils who ask to give up 
their rooms, for any cause, during the year, without giving six weeks' notice to the 
Dean before the beginning of any semester, may be charged for one half of the 
succeeding semester not taken. 

2. Payment of Bills— The bill for each semester is to be paid on or before 
the lirst Jay of the semester, and any pupil who registers for work in any semester 
becomes liable for the expense of the half year, whether day pupil or house pupiL 
[f bills are desired before payment is made, they should be asked for long enough 
in advance to have drafts in the hands of the Dean by the first day of each semester 
For dates, see Calendar, page 5. When students are compelled to be absent by 
protracted illness, covering five weeks or more during term time, the loss for the 
time after room is surrendered may be shared between the pupil and the School, 
time to be reckoned from date when written notice surrendering the room is 
received by the Dean. 

3. During illness pupils pay for the services of the nurse for time actually 
1 in room, and for simple remedies furnished on application. Pupils in the 

IixGrmary are charged Si a day for nurse and meals; $1. 50, if night work is 
needed. In serious illness pupils employ a special nurse and physician, 

4. Laundry* — The laundry must be plain. All pieces difficult to iron will be 
charged extra. Shirtwaists extra between December 1 and April 1. Laundry 
should be marked, in oil cases, with woven names (not initial letters) made 
by J. & J- Cash Co,, South Morwalk, Conn, Write them for prices, giving the 
name of the School They are inexpensive, lasting, and cannot be washed out. 

5. Student Service, — The School offers a limited number of worthy pupils 
of limited means opportunity to reduce dieir expenses by doing clerical work, or 
ordinary housework. Prospective students who seek such aid should write 
the Dean, stating what part of the regular bill it is essential that they earn, 
and what kinds of work they are able and willing to do, 

6* Books, stationery, art materials, toilet articles, inks may be purchased 
at the School Book Store at usual rates. These articles will be sold on credit, 
and an account will be rendered at the end of each semester to patrons who 
deposit Si 5 with the Dean at the opening of each semester to cover these bills. 
Unexpended balances will be returned. Those who prefer not to make deposit 
may secure supplies for cash. 

Parents who wish to intrust spending-money for their daughters to the care 
of the Dean may do so. The School possesses a safe in which such sums are 
secure. Money cannot be loaned pupils by the School or Dean, In emer- 
gencies, money may be sent by telegraph. 



37 




u 

h 
til 



T H E FRANCES 5HIMER SCHOOL 

7. Deposit on Room.— Applications for rooms should be sent to the Dean. 
Tbe sum of $ro must be deposited when a room is engaged for the first time, 
and no room will be reserved unless this deposit has been made. This deposit 
will be deducted from the bill of the second semester; or if the pupil gives up room 
before September 1 the deposit will be returned. 

8. Scholarships. — A scholarship covering tuition for one year in the scholastic 
department is offered to the girl of the highest standing in her studies in each 
high school of Carroll County. A scholarship covering University fees for three 
terms is awarded by die University of Chicago to that one of the graduating class 
of die Frances Shimer School who has stood highest in the work of the School 
time of attendance being also considered. 

0. No pupil may receive a diploma whose bills are not fully paid. No 
pupil is expected to leave the School at any time, until all school bills and 
miscellaneous bills are paid. 

(fctimtl Ktt&rmaJuJtt 

Selection 0} ike Courses of Study.-Tht work of the first year is substantially 

the same for all students. At the beginning of the second year each student will 
choose with the advice of the Dean and the approval of her parents, the course 
best adapted to her needs and aims. 

Special S/«te-Students who do not expect to go to college may select 
such studies as they wish, under the limitations named on p. Hs and may secure 
a ^diploma after having done the fifteen units in any work selected. StZ£ 
who prefer not to work with a view to graduation are free to select such S 

t dIT ' PrOVlded ** kCeP ** ^ 0CCl * ied «* h -e the approval of 

fuUy^n^h ^^ ° f 5 ^-A student, therefore, who has success- 
tmnC c£Lt I H° r^' a " d WishGS t0 entcr > is ****** to the Uni- 
d Llda^ Teh ol f " T^ ° f ^ N ° rth CCntral AsS0dad0n * f Alleges 
E^taJt^ ^ 7* ° ther C ° UegeS With0ut furthcr -aminatioo. 
grade 2 TZ Z^Jn H 0SC u f C h SemCSter - The aVC ^ e 0f ^ *™ 
request as A B C Tn S " f final ^ Which ^ re P 0rted to P a ™* on 
grade being 50 or C mJ^T "^V* "™ an avera S e of D > the examination 
who receive E mi?^ t T*? exMninalio » »**■» six weeks. Those 
laminations, *£%£££* £? 2*» .«*■ *** absent from 

the Schools ^pensaSo^e^Tlot 6 ^i""*?*" " ad ™ 

MmKes^-Pcmi ssion m ,! k f ' SpeciaI laminations, $1. 

absence f rom iJjS^I*"-* «** P-cncable, in advance, for 

» *dl as from reiS S^ ' ^ d "* d ' ^ from stud >' ^ 

brents are requested nouo J dtt ^ T** t0 atte " d ™*>' excise. 

to ask that th«p daughters be excused before the work 

38 



\ L E N 1> A R [ o I 



of the semester is entirely completed. Such requests are rarely granted 
work continues to me hour of cl< ind full work begins at the hour of ooenin 

after winterand spring vacations, Those who have not reported in person to th 
Udy Prindpal or Dean within six hours of the time of opening in January or 
.1 may be required to make up lust recitations and may be required to pay a 
extra work caused thereby. 

-Parents are asked to co-operate with the School in keeping this 
free from visiting, to the end that the rest and quiet and religious exercises 
of the day may not be interrupted. 

Guests: -When notified in advance, the School is glad to entertain relatives 
and friends of pupils not to exceed two days at one lime, at a charge of Si. 50 a 
day. Parents who come to inspect the school, or who bring their daughters to 
the school, are particularly welcome. At commencement this proffer of hospi- 
tality is necessarily limited to Seniors, and in no case can the School entertain 
more than two guests for any one pupil. As a rule no guests can be entertained 
at the opening of the School in the fall. 

Absence from the Town.— No student may, under any circumstances, leave 
the town without permission previously obtained from the Lady Principal, on 
written request of parent. Pupils are not allowed to spend the night away from 
the School except in their own homes. Parents are requested not to ask for 
exceptions to this rule except in emergencies. Such requests are not considered 
unless addressed direct to the Dean and in ample time for correspondence. Such 
absences interfere with the studies and health of the pupil concerned, and also 
disturb the work of other pupils, and if numerous, seriously diminish the 
efficiency of the School. 

Special requests of any kind should come from the parent to the Dean direct, 
not through the student. Parents should not consent to requests by pupils 
involving suspension of School regulations, until written request has been made 
to the Dean direct and answer has been received. 

Advantages oj House Residence.— Students, from out of town are required in 
ail cases, unless residing with near relatives (as near as uncle), to occupy rooms 
in the School buildings. Students occupying such rooms avoid many distrac- 
tions, come into very close contact with the life of the School, and are more likely 
to regard the School work as the one thing demanding their best efforts. They 
are led to cultivate a healthy spirit of self-reliance, and to gain from their fellow- 
students an enthusiasm for study and a knowledge of life. Not infrequently the 
best and most lasting results of school life are derived from its associations. 
Rules for house pupils are furnished on entrance. In general, they provide 
for the order and behavior of the pupils as would be expected in a good home. 
i upds are free within the grounds, twenty-five acres, in recreation hours. 
>hen outside the grounds, they are under the oversight of teachers, as when 

39 




SHI M E R 



s CHool 



r visit dentists, dressmakers, and stores Special provision is made to 
TLce the studies of the younger pupils. All are protected from outside 

fluences Names of roommates cannot be given in advance, 
in \aorn, Furnishings, and Clothing.- Rooms are of different kinds and sizes 
Rooms in Hathaway Hail are intended for two. Several rooms in West Hall 
are single. For extra charge for one pupil in a room, see p. 36. All rooms are 
furnished with hardwood floors, beds, chairs, table, bureau, washstand, and 
window shades. (Windows 6X4, as a rule. Dresser tops 38X19. Commodes 
33X18.) Students furnish rugs (if desired), three sheets, three pillow cases 
(26X20), all bed clothing, six towels {three bath, three plain), four napkins, and 
napkin ring, knife, fork, spoon (for use in their own rooms), one gymnasium suit, 
dark blue preferred (bloomers and blouse) 9 one pair storm rubbers, umbrella, heavy 
walking shoes. Clothing should be plain. Low-necked dresses are forbidden. 
The evening dress may be light in color but should be warm. School is not 
the place for expensive clothing. All articles must be plainly marked with 
J. & J, Cash's woven names (not initials). See under "Laundry" above, 
Beds are single, iron, with low ends, 6 feet 6 inchesX3 feet. Trunks are 
not allowed in the pupil's room but are stored and are accessible. 

Stoves of all kinds, oil, alcohol, gasoline, are prohibited in pupils 1 room; 
chafing dishes also. Pupils are not allowed to keep lamps, candles, or matches 
in their rooms, as a precaution against fire. 

Jewelry, — Pupils are requested to leave expensive jewelry at home. 

Correspondence. — Pupils' letters are never opened by the School. When 
parents wish correspondence restricted, they should furnish list of corresponds 

On entrance every girl will receive personal attention as to her physical con- 
dition. Parents are eamesdy requested to supply any information that would 
assist in forming a just estimate of the pupils 5 physical needs. Parents and 
friends will assist in preserving the health of the pupils if they will not send them 
food or confectionery except at Thanksgiving and on birthdays. This food m 
not include canned or cooked meats or fowl or fish, and must not exceed 
pounds in weight {this is imperative), and must reach Mt. Carroll by the Satur- 
day after Thanksgiving Day. If food h sent at other times it will not be de 
The food furnished by the School is wholesome and abundant. Fruit may 
be furnished pupils if desired. 

Express.— AH express and telegrams must be sent in care of the School, and 
should be prepaid to avoid delay. 

Religious Life 0} the School— Daily chapel services arc hold, attende 
all teachers and pupils. Once a week at chapel a pupil furnishes music, a 
essay, or recitation; and once a week the Dean speaks briefly. 

A weekly prayer-meeting is sustained by the Young Women's Christian : s* 
cialion. Pupils go to church and Sunday school at one of two church* 



40 



C A L E N D A R F K 1911 



A N ]> 



191 



Sunday evening* meeting for the membera of the bouse is held, led by the Dean 
^bj * to* teachers 01 members of Y.W.CA The Intention is that the 

influences in theSchool shall be those of a refined Christian home. 

JP« -'" Sours are on the day preceding the opening of each term, and on 

lay of opening Changes in registration after the first week of t'.uh term, 

50 ceo 1 

U Bust* mmunicaHons should be addressed to the Dean, 

Diplomas an ted pupils who complete the work either in the Scholastic 

Department or in Music, An, Elocution, or Domestic Science, 

fJMLA. 

This organization maintains a weekly prayer-meeting, encourages the social 
life among the pupils, sends delegates to national students' gatherings, takes 
charge of Sunday evening meetings occasionally, and seeks in every way to 
stimulate religious interest among the pupils. 

Counsellor, Mrs, McKee. 

President, Frances Roberts. 

Vice-President, Mary Seaman. 

Secretary, Ann Grimes. 

Treasurer, Eva Roberts, 

Corresponding Secretary, Jeanne Boyd. 

COMHITTEES 

Missionary and Bible Study, Lillian Whitmorc. 

Prayer-Meeting, Mabel Dougherty. 

Intercollegiate, Winifred Seeger. 

Social, Vesta Grimes. 

Practical Service, Margaret Middlckauff. 

55lje JFraurra &l|lmrr Bibmiiim (ttUih 

The Frances Shimer Diversion Club is an organization open to the whole 
student body; there are no restrictions of membership and no dues. This 
club gives frequent entertainments Saturday evenings for the School and 
public. Last year it raised money to beautify the platform of the main audi- 
torium with columns, entablature, and a fine curtain. This year it is seeking 
money to beautify the walls of the auditorium. 

®[jf E&iirattntuil At& Aaratialtmi 

The object of this organization is to secure money to loan to pupils who are 
worthy and have need, and to enrich the library of the School with an annual 
contribution for books. The society consists of alumnae and teachers and friends 
of the School. The officers are: 

President, Mrs, Elhanan Fisher. 
Vice-President, Mrs. Robert Campbell. 

4r 




STUDIO 
I'L'HL'S ROOM 




SHIMER SCHOOL 

Secretary, Mrs. J- »• 

MVc T H Miles. 
T ™*° r "'c. ,A.nL,' Aid Committee, Mr.. W. P. McKw. 

c C ";= Cc-«. ^ b„» a. w* 

QJljr Kraiiian 0ofMg 

This organization includes alumnae, old students, and friends of the School 

Those purpose is to encourage friendly relations between old students and the 

School It holds an annual business meeting at Commencement time and gives 

a program and a picnic supper on the School grounds. The officers of the 

Reunion Society are: 

President, Miss Effie Shaw. 

Vice-President, Miss Jeanne Boyd. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Mary D. Miles. 

COMMITTEE TO REVISE THE CONSTITUTION 

Miss Mary D. Miles 
Mrs. Ross Hostctter 
Miss lona Bickelhaupt 
Miss Mary Nycum 
Mr. C. E. Hostctter. 

SJIjp JHt ffiarmU Srmftianj ani Srattztn Sljtmrr Srhmii AfiBnrialinn nf (Cfjiragn 
President, Miss Margaret Powell, 908 Leland Ave, 

Vice-President, Mrs. Anna Williamson Collins, 287 Keystone Ave., River Forest, III, 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs, Minnie P. Moore. 
Recording Secretary, Mrs, Lillian Hamblen Garst, 4950 Washington Ave. 

Sfoiit <Sitn Sfamrra ftljtmrr &rhunl (Elob 

An association of old students has been organized within the past year in the 
Twin Cities. They have had several meetings, and have furnished the Dean's 
office with valuable information concerning the whereabouts of old students. 
The officers of the association are as follows: 

President. Mrs. Fannie Bartholomew Bailey, Minneapolis. 
WordeTa^^ 18 ' MiSsHelea Hcwitt > Mrs " EIIa Straight Gregory, Mrs 

Secretary, Mr*. Elva Calkjns Bfi ^ ^ 

Treasurer, Mrs. Helen Graham Holmes, 

Kibrartf 

^^ZZa^.T^ dcstroyed in ,,u * rire of FebruMy 9 > l9o6 > 

of its &SS >! t rap y M ' fl,,Kls of lhc Sch ° o1 aml lhe ^ ncrosit y 

the Editors' Fn^l'* *> consists of over i.ioo well-selected volumes, Including 
ami the huesn^ r ;,^ C X9 " cdition of thc Encyclopaedia Britom 

test ed,t 10 n S of Webster's, the Standard, and the ( \ntury dictionaries 

43 



C A L E N D A R FOR 



■ — * y i : 

and other works of reference and a™»^:„i 1 ' 

ing-roo* is supplied ^^SmSS^^ C ° I1CCtk)nS - The «*- 

the W„, Times, Ckicage TrZ?Jt^Z:?tTr> ***** 

tick, Independent, American Journal ?Sfe'^ *****'* 

Hunsey's, Scnbner's, Harper's, North ifJLtZr^' fTO ***' *»**r, 

Uagasine, Literary Digest, Palette a J Bench ' Af! t*™™ IUust ™M 

Ckurck, Tke Musician, **,££& fZ^H^ *"*"' T * 

Magasine, and many of the school papers. g $i,rheUmversit y °f Chicago 

Omnibuses meet all trains. All ba KK aee shoi,H h„ i • , 
owner's name and address, and the HalliT^,,^ P a, " ly marked wi & 

^ed an extra charge for tnsf^ betat '"" " "*** * ** *° 



Uiat of p up ti a j0 AprU j 10n 

* The pupils marked with an asterisk (*) are prirfi f <• l 
year high schools or are doin* college work ch fcfly t S™ 1!^ SHmer Sd ^ « of four- 
academic course. y ' iaCkmg not mor ^ than one unit of graduation in the 

Adams, Marion . 

Aschenbrenner, Delia Elizabeth * • • . 

Ayres, Bemice Marie , * " 

*Baird, Harriett . 

Bashaw, Myrtle Blanche . 

Baume, Ruth Estcy „" * " 

Beers, Jessie Izil . * " * 

♦Berlin, Marie V. "•--•.. Mt Carroll 

*Biekelhaupt, Iona ■•*••... , Chicago 

' * Mt Carroll 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Freemont, Neb, 

Saugatuck, Mich. 

Chicago 

Mt. Carroll 

Mt Carroll 



Mt Carroll 

. Amboy 

Leaf River 

Mt Carroll 

Mt Carroll 

Galena 



^Biackmorc, Agnes Dellison 
"Boyd, Jeanne Margaret 
•Brittain, Julia Elizabeth 
Buck, Helen Louise . 
Bush, Loren . . , ] 
*Bush t Winifred . [ 
Caldwell, Ivy Isabel 



Carpenter, Lela Belle , . 

Carveth, Leila Hazel . . . . 

Casselberry, Nellie B. . ' " ' " 

Chester, Mabel . 

Christian, Lulu " 

Comerford, Charlotte Juliet ! ' ' .' ' ' ' ' rf " ^ 

Cooper, Hazel Mary, GIen EU >™ 

Chicago 

43 



Chicago 

Mt. Carrtll 

Rockford 

Savanna 

Chicago 




■ fl 

■ 

So 






< < 



T H E FRANCES S H I M E R S C 

Countryman, Ruth A. . 
Crane, Helen Cyrenia . . 
Crcager, Catherine Mitchell 
Crcager, Dorotby 
Creager, Margaret 

♦Davis, Ruth Edna , , . 

Dahmen, Celestine McCulIoch 

Dodson, Helen Marguerite 

♦Dougherty, Mabel Maud 
♦Durham, Eva 

Backer, Carlos . . . 
♦Earhart, Ruth Irene 
♦Eaton, Laura Vivian 

Elliott, Drusie Emily 

Ely, Pearl , . . 

Engelbrecht, Florence 

Engles, Mary J, . 

Elbe, Helen . . , 

Eyler, Hazel Lillian . 
♦Feezer, Gladys , . 
♦Felkncr, Mabell Dee 

Frederick, Edith 
Fuller, Irene , . 
Gage, Margaret . . 
Garrettson, KaLhryn 
Geisman, Helen . 
*Gi!log]y, Laurel Elaine 
Grant, Irene Lottie 
Grau, Stella . 
Green, Carolyn Marie 
G «gory ( Helen . 
Griffis, Helena Rachel 
*Grimcs ; Ann Blanche 
Grimes, Vesta Lucile. 
Grindley, Rose . 
Groezinger, Lillian Carolyn 
*Hakcs, Cathryn Marie 
Hakes, Nona Carolyn 
Hansen, Arlenc Cathry 
Hartmau, Charles 
Hayden, Hazel V. V. 
Heller, Meianie . 
ffirsch, Lucile Helen 
Hisscm, Joseph . 
Hoefer, Bertha G. 




U 



Rochclle 
Kansas City, Mo, 
Kendallville, Ind. 
KendallviHe, Ind. 
Kendallville, Ind. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Chicago 
. Mt Carroll 
Evanston 
. Mt. Carroll 
. ML Carroll 
Chrisman 
. Mt, Carroll 
Vinton, Iowa 
- Mt, Carroll 
. Mt, Carroll 
Lanark 
Chicago 
. Mt. Carroll 
. . ML Carroll 
Waterloo, Iowa 
. Mt. Carroll 
Wauwatosa, Wis, 
Chicago 
San Diego, Cal, 
Shannon 
. . Mt, Carroll 
Draiesville, Iowa 
Muscatine, Iowa 
• * - ■ Peoria 
Michigan City, Ind. 
Ft, D, A. Russell, Wyo. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Paw Paw, Mich. 
Chicago 

■ - Elizabeth 

■ Laurens, Iowa 
; Laurens, Iowa 

F *- Atkinson. Wis. 
" ; Ml Carroll 

■ St Louis, .Mo. 
Chicago 

Archbold, Ohio 

' ■ Mt. Carroll 

1'VceporL 



CALENDAR F 

Holbert, Charmioo , 

•HoJden, Alice Ludle 

Hurley, I Kirn Louise . 

Johnson, Helen Eldonna 

Johnson, Irene Louise 
♦Jones, Ella A 

Jones, Norma Rachel 

Joslin, Mary IL . 

Kane, Grace . 
•Kelley, Florence .... 

Kersey, Julia Fay 
•Kinkade, Marianne Myrtle 




. Greeley, Iowa 

* ■ Chrisman 

■ ■ Ml Carroll 

Chicago 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Williamsburg, Iowa 

. Marengo, Iowa 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Chicago 

Paw Paw, Mich. 

Shannon 

Lanark 



Kopf t Rose Christina " * 

Lamb, Madge Carpenter " ' „ C i icag0 

Lang, Mabel . . Mt * Carro11 

- - Mt. Carroll 

Minneapolis, Minn, 

Archbold, Ohio 

Davenport, S.D, 

. . Mt Carroll 

- . Mt. Carroll 
. . Mt Carroll 

Savanna 
Chicago 



Leach, Doris Mildred 

Levy, Ruth 

Lovald, Laura Grace 

McCall, Catherine V ' 

McKee, Margaret Elizabeth . . . . 
Mackay, Isabel . . . . 

Maloney, Emily 

Markle, Gwendolyn Violet . 

Martin, Louise Evelyn ....'.'.'.','..][ Ben^oTvle 

Marm Vesta Coldwater, Mich. 

*Mcrntt, Mary-Emily . tw..*i, u- 

w.m,, ,/,. * ' Duluth, Minn. 

Middlekauff, Margaret Lucy . . . . Lanark 

Miles, Owen . , . . tut*, n u 

Ari ' , , Mt. Carroll 

IS* ? ? re Mt - Ca ™>" 

^ lle ^ 0S ^ .ML drill 

Morclock, Hester CJ - 

•Nast Eualah Margaret . ." ." .' .' ." .' ; Marblehead, S£ 

Nay, Nora Lucile Morgan Park 

Newcome, Beth Ann South Haven, Mich. 

No an, Hester Ft. Meade, S.D. 

Nckn Blanche Duolap Ft. Meade, S.D. 

INobuhara, Mihoye ™ t 

OWson.Edna Okayama Japan 

Opdyck^Amy £ T^ 

Pcrcival, Mabel H. p , C ° rd ° Va 

■o^ I 1 H " ' • - Champaign 

Peters, Anna Julia *, A „ 

PiUele, Esther U °^ cU ° 

Pool, Sophia Harlan ' " r* • -n T 

*R3edy, Olive Loiusville, Ky. 

[ p^i. . -^ * Mt* Carroll 

Roberts, Eva Alice Peoria 



45 



H E F R A N C ■ E S SHIM E 



Roberts, Frances Tuttle 
Robinson, Edith Alice 
Rollins, Hazel Eery] 
Sampson, Miriam Lucile 
*Schaale, Julia Hunt . 
Schroeppcl, Ora . . 
Schultz, Lenore Alice 
Seaman, Mary Azalia 
Seeger, Winifred 
Sharp, Ruth . . , 
♦Shatwell, Ertel Garnet 
Shaw, Gertrude Katherine 
Shirk, Harriett Isabelle 
Sites, Bessie . , 
Sjoholm, Elizabeth Lillian 
Skinner, Eirmah Margaret 
Smith, Gladys Dean 
Smith, Helen F. . . 
Snook, Neta . . , 
Sonierville, Florence 
Spalding, Beatrice , 
Stiefel, Charlotte 
Strong, Lida Packard 
*Sweitzer, Viola M. . 
*3word, Julia Cecil 
Tallman, Marjorie . 
Threshic, Marion 
Tilton, Mona Maude 
Vette, Rachel 
Weidman, Marie 
Weld, Gladys 
Whiffcn, Marjorie Smith 
Whiffcn, Marion 
*Whitmore, Lillian 

Whittlesey, Jessamine ' 
Jj k, Harriett Helen 
Willard, Elva L 

Wok, La ura Ada 
Wood, Pearl 
J^t. Dorothy" 

You «et Marie 




' ■ - Peoria 
Goodfield 

• ■ Chicago 
Galena 

• - Ml Carroll 
■ - Mt Carroll 

Williams, Iowa 

• Mitchell, S.D. 
Glenwood, Iowa 

- . Mt Carroll 

• Clinton, Iowa 
♦ Lee Center 

Sutherland, Iowa 

• - Alt. Carroll 
Chicago 

Iowa Falls, Iowa 

• - Oak Park 

■ Madison, Wis. 

• . Mt, Carroll 

■ * Mt, Carroll 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Angola, Ind. 

Morgan Park 

■ • Mt. Carroll 

* Mt. Carroll 

Lanark 

. Dunlap 

Morrison 

- Marengo, Iowa 

- . Mt. Carroll 
Ft Atkinson, Wis, 

Chicago 

Chicago 

West Union, Iowa 

Gilmore City, Iowa 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Empire, Mich. 

Lanark 

Lanark 

Fremon 

Mi. Carroll 

Columbia, S.I v. 

. Morgan Park 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



4* 



CALENDAR FOR 



niiiv 
i . 

Michigan 

Indiana 
>nsin 
*uri 

Minnesota 



■ i 



AND 



1 9 i 2 



SXATK8 AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES BEPRESENTED, I, 

South Dakota 



t8 

7 
7 
6 

4 
3 



Nebraska 
Ohio . 

California 
Wyoming 
Kentucky 

Japan . 



Total, 158 



' ■ • 5 
a 



(SJrfor for % Bay 



6:30 
7:00. 

8:15-12:15. 
10:15-10:30. 

12:25. 

x: 15-3: 30. 
3:30-5:00. 

5:00. 

5 : 3°- 
6:15-6:45. 



Rising bell. 

Breakfast, 

Recreation, short walk, room work. 

Study, recitations, and practice. 

Chapel. 

Lunch. 

Study, recitations, studio. 

Recreation and physical culture. 

Preparation for dinner. 

Dinner. 

Visiting hour, 
6:45-9:00, Study and practice. 
9:30. Lights out. 
Saturday evening, recreation. 
Monday, 7:30-10:00 A.M., room cleaning. 

Study hours, 10:00-12:00 and 6:45-9:00 p.u. No recitations on Monday. 
Monday afternoon, recreation and shopping, 
Sunday, 2:30-5 :oo p.m., quiet hour. 



GratotatM nf flit Curtail Bmimxy txnh of tip? JffrattrM 

§>Jjimer Btl^aoi 

™a ^? ra -r Fri ? ds arc urscd to W P us kee P this [kt c °rrect by sending notice of change of address 
«w of deaths and marriages. t 



CLASS OF 1862 

Man. Allison (Mrs. W. M.) Jenks t 1820 

v St., Sacramento, Cal 
Anna Mary Bigger Hrowrd, Jefferson, 

Sophia Towne, 423 Park St., Topeka, 
•Mary White 
♦Deceased. 



CLASS OF 1864 

*Nancy Brainard Williamson 
*Hannah Grouse (Mrs. L. O.) Tomlinson. 

Harriet O'Neal, Caralog, Cal, 

Mary Mason, 5406 Jefferson Ave,, 
Chicago. 

Mary Matthews Burnap, Clear Lake, la. 

Frankie Snow Lyman t Oak Park 



47 




COMMENCEMENT PROCESSION 
MAY DAY PERFORMANCE 



T H E F RANGES SHIMER SCH O O 



,. 



CLASS OF 1S65 

*VioIa Blake (Mrs. Frank) Tracy 
Hattie IJollin^shead 
*Libbie Lunt Hull 

CLASS of 1S68 

Lou Foote Leland, Ottawa 
Clara McDeannon Reynolds, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

CLASS OF 1S60 

Alice Briggs Duer, 14S S, Lincoln Ave., 

Denver, Colo, 
Nellie Charles 
♦Mary L. Hathaway Corbett 
Dora Lambertson Nichell, Beatrice, 

Neb. 
Retta Tomlinson, Mt. Carroll 

CLASS OF 1 87 1 

Winona Branch (Mrs. A, J,) Sawyer, 

Lincoln, Neb. 
Laura Dennison Dineharl, Chicago 
Alice Ives Breed, Cambridge, Mass. 
Libbie Kimball Washburn, Chicago 
Emma Piper (Mrs. Charles) Kciter, 

Grundy Center, la, 
Priscilla Pollack Bell, 2418 Eliot St. 

Denver, Colo, 

Lillian Seymour McAffee (Music) 
♦Maty Smith Kelly 
Minnie Swift Yates 

Ma £>Sd Lkh,h I29 s - Third St * 

CLASS OF 1872 

Vena Merit Cook, Fairburv 

Emma Tomlmson LovdJd, Dixon 

CLASS OP 1873 

*Lucina Benson Batty 
vena Merit Cooh <Music\ P»«-i 
Emma Pannebakw. >. IC >' *airbury 

,„ Mt CaJr C ™»> (Music), 
Minnie Randall I„ce 

class of rS7 4 
* Deceased, 



Albio 




: 



CLASS OF 1875 

Gertrude Brown Murrak, Creal Springs 
Virginia Dox, 195 Barker St., Hartford 

Conn. 
Julia Fitch 
Jennie Gowen, Chicago 

♦Laura Holland 

Flora Keith Newton, Jerseyviile 
Mary Mooney Scott, New Berlin 
Martha Powell, Sutherland, la. 
Lillian Riley West, Rockford 

♦Lillian Seymour McAffee 

♦Emma Shed Avery 

CLASS OF 1S76 

Lizzie Cairns Trimble, 3S3 1 
Place, Seattle, Wash, 
♦Mary DeWitt St. Johns 

Benise Dupurs, Savanna 
♦Vena Hurley 

Alice Lichty, Bowling Green, Fla 
Anna Roper Thayer, 40r W. Chestnul 

it, BJoomington 
Ella Straight Gregory, 592 Carroll Ave., 

St Paul, Minn. 
Blanche Strong, 5343 Madison Ave 

Chicago 
Viola Thomas Markley 

Matilda a Vernon, Marquette Bid*, 

Chicago 
Clara White (Mrs. W. E.) Robinson, 1401 
Williams Blvd., Springfield (music) 

CLASS OF 1877 

May Button Squire, Trempealeau, Wis. 
Helen Eacker, Lawrence, Kan. 
Saddte Hall Spencer 
Ara Ingalls Morgan, Kewance 
Fannie Ireland Hart, Boulder, Colo. 
barali Mooney Palmer, 414 W, 7th St., 

Topeka, Kan, 
Nellie Shirk (Mrs, J, M,) Rinewalt, Mt. 

Carroll 
Mary Spencer Wright 
Clara White (Mrs. \V. E.) Robinson, 1401 

Williams Blvd., Springfield 
Nellie Wilder (Mrs. T\ p.) Ireland, 

48 Van Lice Ave., Yonkers, N.Y. 

CLASS OF 1878 

Elizabeth Barber (Mrs. W, R.) Hostetier, 

Mt, Carroll, 
Jennie Cummtogs (Mrs. E. O.) Lee, 

E. South Temple St, Salt J Sty. 

Utah 



48 



C A L E N I> A R F O R 



Mwv Green (Mrs. J. M.) If raid, 
Nashua, la, 

tetter, Ml Carroll 
•Elisabeth [rvine 

ibel Jon 
♦Vena Mackay Bede 

it lss or i8/g 

Axtel, Mounl Ayr, la, 
A; lapmail (Mrs. l\ \V.) Parker, 

Hotel del Prado, Chi< ag 
Nellie Graham (Mrs. John) George, 
: Summit Place, St. Paul, Minn. 
Mary K. Tones Zow, Walnut St., 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Ora Knowlton Flynn, Platteville, Wis. 
Zilpha Rowe 

ie Rupple Grcnd 
■m Rupple ire t Alliance, Neb. 

Sweigart Nytnan, Mi, Carroll 
ei Thompson Davis 
Jennie Wishon Buchanan, Cheyenne 
Cola 

CLASS OF iSSo 

Delia Angle IVoodivorth, 374 14th St., 
Portland, Orv, 

gie Benton, 2266 So. Columbine St. 
University Park, Colo, 
Laura ^ Coleman, 3517 Indiana Ave, 

Chicago 
-ydia Duell Enslow 

Susan Hostettcr (Mrs. Henry) Mackay 
Mt. Carroll 
•Jennie Mackay Coleman 
Helen Mackay Weston, Hay Springs 
Neb. " * 

•Ada Melendy 

Idell Miles, aoS Union St., Manchester 
la. 

Abbie Pinkharn Chadboume, 87 Russell 
oL t Manchester, N.H. 

•Clara Shirk Mackay 

•Susie Shirk Strickler 
Myrtle Stevens Bennett, Chicago 
Ella Thornton Whiting, Batavla 

CLASS OF iSSl 

Elva Calkins (Mrs. W. E.) Briggs, 760 
Lilian Hamblen (Mrs. Thos. B.) Garst, 

'deceased 







■me 






Anna Williamson C^„, aR , ., 
Aye., Rive ^ • 7 Keyst 

Et * wood c^ R! :, llamti Ho 

CLASS OF 1882 

UUgja Clenamer, Lanark 

*Ella Hammers £«««. 
Carrie M. Howard U' 0£>f Wd k 
Harbors, Minn. "«««*, Two 

"aUS-aS""* * it st. 

II M .,e Wiloy (M„ c. H.) Jf„„, 7 „ 
J at., Lincoln, Neb 

Julia A, Wishon, Elizabeth 

CLASS OF 1SS3 

♦LOlie Hall Bean 

CLASS OF 1884 

* Joanna J. Claywell 
Mary Guenther 

Gertrude Halteman Walsh, 1138 Elnv 
wood Ave., Evanston 

Nellie Hobbs Smythe, Benton Harbor 
Mich. J 

Vickie Johnson, 202 Galena St., Freeport 

Alice Lichty, Bowling Green, Fla. 

Madge Myers Hishp, 6619 Washing- 
ton Ave., Chicago 
*HeIen Perrine Day 
*Carrie Smith 

Grace White Mighrfl, Lake City, la. 

CLASS OF 18S5 

Ella Bean Mason, Spokane, Wash, 
Elia Campbell (Mrs. Geo. E.) Whitman, 

Burton, Wash. 
Grace Coleman (Mrs. J. S.) Miles, Mt. 

Carroll 
Cora Coleman (Mrs. Wm.) Machay, 

ML Carrol! 
Madge Myers Hislop (Music), 6619 

Washington Ave., Chicago 
Nettie E. Phillips, Thomson 



49 




GLIMPSES OF THE CAMPUS WITH DEARBORN, HATHAWAY IXD 
METCALF HALLS I\ PART 



THE 



FRAN C E S S H I M E R S C H O O L 



CLASS OF lSS6 

Clara Ferguson, M.D. (Music), 103 

State St., Chicago 
Alice Ferris, Oak Park 
Louise S. Graper, Vinita, Okla. 
Edith Kenney Butt, 2609 Le Contc Ave,, 

Berkeley, Cal. 
Margaret Mastin Ward, Silver Creek, 

N.Y, 
Sadie E. Wiley, Salida, Colo. 
Cora Wisbon Beadett, Pearl City 
E. Eluvia Wright, 626 1 7th St., Molinc 
Fannie Yates Jacobs, Chicago 

class OF 1SS7 

♦Caroletta Betts Jones 
Margaret Fisher Turman s 1629 S. 5th 

St., Terre Haute, IncL 
Harriet Halderman (Mrs, Robt.) Webb, 

$62 B, 57th St, Chicago 
Jessie Hall {Mrs. J. H;) Miles, Mt 

Carroll 
Mary* B. Hofer, 59 W. 96th St., New 

York City 
Jean Hughes (Mrs. A. F.) Plambech, 

425 N. H St, Fremont, Neb. 
*Laura Jacobsen Barker 
Mary B. Lkhty Simpson, Clyde 
Emma Myers Edwards, Storm Lake, la 
Margaret Powell, 908 Letend Ave 

Chicago 
Rose Wcinlandex Tyler, Norfolk, Neb, 

class of rSSS 
Martha M. Brown, Fifth Ave,, Toliet 

Maud Elder (Mrs. H. M.)Boa Sl Garner, 

Edna C. Estabrooke, Milledgcvitlc 

Brit p ' Fenn ' Cftm *nche, la. 
Bctic Ferguson, Sterling 

"■ v!n g Sl ,1S ' 3 °° W " CMW Ave., 
Laura Powell Thomas 



: 



Ethel Roe r^jR? zSr 0rd 

*** & 4;4 vanston 

r,or S c To « b*/^ New York 

* Deceased. 



CLASS OF 1S89 

Mary Brockway (Mrs. George) Cornish 
333 Mountain St., Montreal, Canada" 
*lLllen Eastman 

Ruth Estabrooke Kilbourne, 5423 Wash- 
ington Ave., Chicago 

M. Elva Gale, 564 Lake St., Chicago 

Fannie E. Gibbs, 51 Park Ave. W 
Springfield, Mass, 

Harriet Haltcman (Mrs, J. B.) Mere- 
dtih, 501 Jackson Ave., JopLin, Mo. 

Emma R. Hiserodt Fleming, Frogrnore, 
La. 

Harriet Nasc (Mrs. J, R.) ConnelL Mt 
Carroll 

Edith M, Wherritt, Mt Carroll 

class of 1S90 
*Mabel Abcrnethy Gilten 
Zella Bclding (Mrs, N, M.) Davis, West 

Chicago 
Nellie A, Bussey Smith, Dixon 
Rose M. Demrnon, 3000 Michigan Ave 

Chicago 
Levisa Duell (Mrs, Richard) Ditto 

Corona, S.D. ■* 

Louise Graper, Vinita, Okla 
Harriet Nase (Mrs. J. R.) Connetl 

(Music), Mt, Carroll 

a ?l et . Shirk ( Mrs - R - C.) Wells, 
Marshalltown, la. 

Margaret E. Winters, DuQuoin 

CLASS OF 1891 

Dclana E. Bailey, Mt. Carroll 
Frances R. Coleman, Mt. Carroll 
Edna Dunshee (Mrs. Edward) Mann, 

2916 E. 77U1 St., Chicago 
Julia Heil, Decatur 
*Pclla P. Parkinson 
M- Etta PfcifTer, Fairview 
Mabel Richardson Knap Pi 7 r 3 Ashland 
Ave., Rockford 

CLASS OF 1S92 
Sarah I, Bole, Frecport, Pa 

Ire ^ Chapman Shcpardson, Pittsburg, 



Roberta Forest Cornet, Pasadena, Cal. 
™ Hall (M rs . J. fc) Miles, Mt. 



So 



F O R 



CALENDAR 



Mfay Hatch 1M1, B, A.) Kinsley, 
Wd la. 

*Graco L Button (Mu 
Bertha Lewis (Mrs, W, k.) Crandell 

13th Si., Rock I land 
Katharine Mi Grath 

tfra, G.) tf™«rf/, Mt 
CarroU 

►Fella P. Parkinson (Art) 

Jrssu- Pottle Brownett, Newark, N.J. 

lie Rfley .iftto//, Soldier, Idaho 
Elisabeth Roggy, an Seminary Ave, 

Blixmiing; 
Grace Saxton Avery, Jacinto, Cal. 
Alice Wildcy (Mrs. J, l>.) Turnbaugh, 

Mt. Carroll 

CLASS OF 1893 

Vilona C. Brownlec (Mrs. James A.) 

Palmer, Sioux Falls, S.D. 
Lillian Hittle (Mrs. G. W.) Bergtotd 

2107 E. 4th St, Duluth, Minn. 
Sarah E. White 

CLASS OF 1894 

Grace M, Bawden, Mt Carroll 
Bernice Bishop Whitney, Minneapolis, 
Mmn, 

Mabel Booth (Mrs. Wm. F.) Brewer, 

720 Third Ave., S. Bozeman, Mont! 
Geneva Cochran Kicr, Sterling 
Effie Hallett (Airs. S. B.) Spur, Stras- 

burger, Neb. 
Julia Hanson, Murphysboro 
Grace Harvey Penfield (Music), Hotel 

Montana, Butte, Mont, 
Margaret Lawson, 1420 6th St., S.E . 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

^l eI ? T^ an ^ aU L ™**** Tacoma, Wash. 

iithel Rhodes, Amos, W.Va. 

Jennie Robinson Dell 

Myra Stellc Stajnm, 250 East 53d Ave , 

Los Angeles, Cal, 
Dorothy Topping Wood, Kansas City, 

Mo. J 

Clara Troutfetter (Mrs. A. J.) Miles, 
iVlt. Larroll 

Florence Tumey (Mrs. W. P.) McKee, 

Mt Carroll 
Mirnu Whitoell Cummings 

Maud E. Wilson Lynn, Grundv Center, 
J.a. - * 

* Deceased. 




*S OP 1895 

Chloe Baker Sanders 

"*&£?" **" EUh ' W—Polli. 
Myrtle France* BalW.l f Mrs T(lhn , 

C Neb FOTC,lberg Dunsan > **■»**, 
[da Florence Bastlan, Frecnorf 
Mrs.Lydia V. Frank ** " 
MlmueFourt Bet,, Fort Totten.ND 

Mary 1). Miles, Mt. Carroll 

Beauregard St, Pendleton, Ore 9 

Lynne Waddcll, Shcpherdstovvn, W.Va. 

CLASS OF 1896 

L °^J t B £ te '' 3lS E " Ioth St., Daven- 
Bessjc Beaver SchreiUr, Savanna 
Bessie Blamer (Mrs. Geo. V.) Turner 

Rome, N.Y, *"rney, 

♦Ada Butz (Music) 
Clara Ferrenberg Dungan (Music), 

Hastings, Jfeb. 
Theresa Fourt Lyman, 205 E, 8th St., 

Topeka, kan. 
*Aimee Glass Bah 
Lizzie Hollinger (Mrs, Harry) Hoffman 

Nampa, Idaho 
Bessie Hutchinson Cochran, 274 Dayton 

Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

CLASS OF 1 89 7 (ACADEMY) 

Edna Appleby (Mrs. W. B.) Schuttz 
(Piano), Alden, la. 

Gertrude Board, Sn Fulton St-, Wau- 
sau, Wis. 

Nellie Foster (Voice), 800 Broadway, 
Mt Pleasant, la. 

Edna Heald, 147 Olive Ave., N., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Frances Maud Shirk Hogg (Voice), 
Westwood, N.J. 

class of 1S98 

♦Marcia H. Arnold (Piano) 
Bonnie Baird Replogle (Certificate in 

Piano), Mt. Carroll 
Mary Fry, Cedarville 
Mary D. Miles (Voice), Mt Carroll 



a 



THE F R A NCES 5HIMER SCHOOL 



LoueJIyn Rogers (Mrs. C. R,) Shackcl- 

ion, 4252 Jackson Blvd., Chicago 
Jennie Sanford (Mrs. C, W.) Gosncy 

(Piano), 340 Benton Blvd., Kansas 

City, Mo. 
Alice Sheldon Jamison (Piano), Leeds, 

N.D. 
Edna Smith (Piano), Rapid City, S/D. 
M. Genie ve Taylor (Voice), Taylorvillc 
Eita Williams {Mrs. L, M.) Siurtevant 
(Voice), Madison, Wis, 

class of 1S99 

Jessie Capperunc (Mrs. B, P.) Stewart, 
127 Maplewood Ave., Peoria 

Alice May Gibbs, Lamoille 

Rosabel Glass, 4104 Whitman Ave,, 
Seattle, Wash, 

Adeline Hostetter (Mrs, Rudolph) Bjorh- 
quist, 1S10 E. 4 th St., Duluth, Minn, 

Texa W. Jordan (Piano), 74 16th 5t„ 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

Ethel Kcnvon (Mrs. Win.) Pierce 

(Piano), Ml Carroll 
Mary Nourse, Way land Academy, Hang- 
chow, China 
Edith Weber (Mrs. Frank) Tims 
Tama, la, 

class of 1900 

Edna Pearl Ames, 20 Illinois St., 

Chicago Heights, UL 
Alice Baldwin Wtbh t Kettle Falls, Wash 
Zoa -Chambers Dcets (Piano), 3438 Glen 

AbLyn Drive, Los Angeles, Cal 
Lco,a Belle Col e CaZagH, % N. 

uurr St, Kewanee 
iheo Candis Crativ Rijord Chicacm 
♦Catherine Lee DeFord fi 

Rena Eckern (Mrs T T \ nr*r * 

Gertrude Evenngtoo (Mrs. O F> 
^S' II2 Bod ^ Ave., Peta- 

CLASS OF Iqoi 

Chicago CraU - V Ri ^ d (Music), 
L, ^^«4N.No rmalPark . 



Lute Eraser, Wewoka, Okla. 

Edna Grace Grattan Collins (Piano) 

169 Mariner St., Buffalo, NY 
Mary Dell Halderman (Piano), Mt 

Carroll 

Leona May Hess (Piano), Lanark 
Helen Imlay Hewitt, 3029 Irving Ave, 

So,, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Eva May Holman (Piano), Mt. Carroll 
Loie Kelley (Mrs, H. K) Thompson 

Ortonvillc, Minn, 
Bertha May Kinney, Stoughton, Wis 
Elva Lemoine (Mrs. D. D.) Macdanald 

926 Winnie St, Galveston, Tex 
Jessie Matkin Fisher (Piano), 40c \V 

Harrison St., Danville 
Earl Smith (Certificate in Piano), Mt 

Carroll 
Judith Weill Louwttkal, 4601 Michigan 
Ave., Chicago 

CLASS OF 1902 

Gertrude Barthcl OlmsUad. Millcdcc- 
ville 

Bessie Dodson (Mrs, C M.) Wolf, 

Alta, la. Ji 

Jennie Grace Doty, 44 Pickering Bid*, 

Cincinnati, O. & 

Marion Corlett Hallert, Sterling 
Mary Grace Hazelton (Mrs, L E) 

OrcuU (Piano), 4601 Florence Blvd., 

Omaha, Neb. 
Harriet Hersey Higginson (Piano) 
Adaline Hosteller (Mrs, Rudolph) Bjork- 

qutst (Piano), Duluth, Minn 
Angeline Beth Hbstetter, Mt Carroll 
barah Derma Mackay, Mt. Carroll 
Mary Washington Nycum, Mt, Carroll 
Grace Reynolds (Mrs. J. W.) Squires 

(Voice), Mt Carroll 
Margaret McNeill Simpson, Riverside 

CLASS OF 1903 

Clara Louise Ackerman, Coleta 
S 8 " Bottom, Blackfoot, Idaho 

I Wen? ? iaml S fS (Art >> MilledgeviHe 
R?^^' Worland, Wya 
Ruth Dcets MUter, Sunnyside, Wash! 
Mary Angeline Gillmore, 4049 Indiana 
Ave., Chicago 

°'roH Hammond (Piano), Mt. Car- 

Evelyn Hammord (Mrs. Arthur) Owen, 
7204 Union Ave., Chicago 



53 



VrI , tfammen Gray, SinnamaboniDg, 
uA. Matthew* /— ', Bedford, 

■■.*»,!. :■ W„, mv„., 

Weddell, Cleveland, O. 
Williams (Mm. Wm. C.) 
., Coulee City, Wash. 

CLASS OF 1904 

Clara Loui ^ii?!?* 

Clark, 1037 La Salic Ct, 

South Bend, Ind. 
Elsie Anna Comstock (Piano), Phoenix, 

Zdla Elizabeth Cook von Brenigk, 

3059 Montrose Ave., Chicago 
Rilla Preston Meyers (Piano), Boulder, 

Blanche Yule Thorn, North Bend., Neb. 
Mabel Mills Zigler, 109 Park Ct., Cedar 
Rapids, la* 

class OF 1905 

Ada Dorothy Ahlswede, 2039 Ewing 

Place, Chicago 
Bessie Kingery Beck, Mt Carroll 
Henrietta Benedict, 3520 Dodge St,, 

Omaha, Neb. 
Sue Rebecca Clark, 1037 La Salle Ct,, 

South Bend, Ind, 
Anna Davis (Mrs, F. A.) Durlacher, 

6157 Michigan Ave,, Chicago 
Izelie Opal Emery, 2333 W. 27 St, 

Los Angeles, CaL 
Libbie Belle George, Monticello, la. 
Avis Hall (Mrs. E, C.) Wade, 1005 E 

St., RE., Washington, D.C. 
Pauline Hay ward Krmtcr, Peoria 
Mary R. Payne, Chrisman 
Blanche Beulah Phillips, 921 State St,, 

Hood River, Ore, 
Jearmette Shivery, 4304 Kenmore Ave., 

Chicago 

CLASS OP 1906 

Jessie Carley, Mt, Carroll 
fcthel Coburn, Smithwick, S.D 



Eva Ms? '<"'"'■'" C'"""'' Mt ' Carr °" 

Mt. Carroll 
Anna Reese, Savanna 
Georgetta Shippy, 31 Lincoln Place, 

Chicago 
Louise Stevens, Downers Urove 

CLASS OF I907 

Florence Baird, Indianola 
Adeline Blough (Piano), Mt. Carroll 
Jessie Miles Campbell, Mt, Carroll 
Ethel Coburn (Expression), Smithwick, 

S.D. 
Eva I. Durham, Mt. Carroll 
Phoebe Graham (Piano), Mt. Carroll 
Jearmette Green (Piano) 
Martha Florence Green, 210 Missouri 

Ave., Peoria 
May Belle Harris (Mrs. Harry) Horn- 

'stein, 6106 Princeton Ave,, Chicago 
Eva May Holman (Voice), Mt. Carroll 
Echo Lewis, Thomson 
Margaret Anna Morgan, Buda 
Nellie Caroline Odbert, Indianola 
Althea Purcell (Mrs. F. M.) Sumner, 

131 t Main St., Boise, Idaho 
Grace Reynolds (Mrs, J. W.) Squires 

(Voice-medal), Mt. Carroll 
Mary Rhodes (Mrs. Geo.) Jtanmariat r 

Mt. Carroll 
Julia Hunt Schaale (Certificate), Mt. 

Carroll 
Louise Wallace, Amboy 

class of 190S 

Zoa May Bronson, Spencer, la, 
PL May Cole, McDonald, Kan. 
Bertha Irene Corbett, Mt. Carroll 
Zclla Catherine Corbett, Mt. Carroll 
Hazel Elizabeth Evans, Milledgeville 
Ellen Marie Feuling, Ames, la. 
Beulah Glendale Litchfield, Flanagan 
Florence May Lougee, 400 Oakland 

Ave., Council Bluffs, la. 
Lela Louise Moore, Bloornington 
Winifred Munroe, Chicago 
Edwina Madge Myers, Chicago 
Beulah Elizabeth Rowlands, Davenport, 

la. 

Marietta Brooks Smith (Mrs. Carl E.) 
Dretdzer, Sturgeon Eav, Wis. 

Ethel Rosamond Warfield, Mt. Car- 
roll 



53 




S SHIMER SCH O O L 



CLASS OF 1909 

t ~ n \farcriret Bovd, Fremont, Neb, 
K /S? Campbell (Certificate), 

Mt. Carroll 
Beatrice Drainer (Piano), Lanark 
Eva Independence Durham (Expres- 
sion), Mt, Carroll 
Frances Durham, Mt. Carroll 
Geneva Mae Eacker, Mt. Carroll ^ 
Martha Florence Green (Expression), 

210 Missouri Ave., Peoria 
Harriett Munn Leigh, 3758 Sheffield 

Ave., Chicago 
Marjorie Justccn Leigh, 3758 Sheffield 

Ave., Chicago 
Myrtle Louise Lewis, Tampico 
Harnett Janette Melrose, Gray vi He 
Margaret Munroe, 5468 Ridgwood Ct, 

Chicago 
Zella Athena Petty, Mt. Carroll 
Martha Powell (Public-School Music), 

Williamsburg, la. 
Eva Alice Roberts, 700 Ravine Ave., 

Peoria 
Edith Teoletta Sawyer, Shabbona 
Aha Minerva Sawyer, Shabbona 
Fonda Frances Seely, Morrison 
Laura Alice Turnbaugh (Mrs* Chas.) 

Stewart (Domestic Science) , M t . 

Carroll 
Floy Edith Welch, Eldora, la. 



Helen Marian Welsh, 1222 Storv ^t 
Boone, la. - l » 

Josephine Rose Woost (Mrs. R n 
BcardeHf Pckin ^ 

CLASS OF 1 9 10 

College 

Zella.Catherine Corbett, Mt Carroll 
Martha Florence Green, Peoria 

Academy 

Harriett Margueriette Baird, Mt 

Carroll 
Mabel lona Bickelhaupt, Mt Carroll 
Winifred May Bush, Mt Carroll 
Hazel Mae Cooper, Chicago 
Mabel Maud Dougherty, Evanston 
Laurel Elaine Gillogly, Mt, Carroll 
Alida Bartlett Hopps, Lamoille 
Ellen M. Melendy, Thomson 
Grace Elizabeth Merriman, Dixon 
Eva Caroline Sawyer, Shabbona 
Hazel Gay Smillic, Eaton, Colo. 
Helen Miles Stockier, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Julia Cecil Sword, Mt Carroll 
Dorothy Carleton Trask, Las Esper- 

anzaSj Coahuila, Mexico 
Fern Harriett Waffle, Marion, la. 
Dana Willcox, Lovilia, la. 
Luella Ruby Woodworth, Fairfax, Va. 



12. 
29. 



19 ig 
September iq, 
September 24, 
October i, 
October 
October 
October 
November 
November 5. 
November 5. 
November 7. 
November 12. 
November 19. 
November 28, 
December 3. 
December 5, 
Di-cembcr i . 



EttftttS 

Who's Who Party (College Girls), 

Y.W-C.A. Reception. 

Miss Knight entertained Seniors. 

Piano Recital, Emil Liebling. 

Miss Payne entertained Juniors. 

Hallowe'en Party (Juniors). 

Recital by Sybil Sammis MacDermid, Dramatic Soprano, 

Recital by Elocution Pupils. 

Miss Bowman and Miss Green entertained Sophomores and Freshmen 

Lecture, "Portugal/' Professor Jerome Hall Raymond. 

Diversion Club, "Cousin Thorny." 

Orchestra Party. 

Chicago Glee Club. 

Music Pupils entertained by Miss Knight. 
School Glee Club Concert. 
Freshman Christmas Party. 

54 



CALENDAR p R 



1 i i 



December 
December 

tgn 

January 



"< Pupils' Christmas Rcdtd 

i4. Seniors entertained by Miss KiUght 



A N D 



9 I 2 



luary 
January 

January 
February 
truary 

February 

February 
February 



February 

February 
February 
March 

March 
April 
April 
April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 
June 
June 
June 
June 



16. Illustrated Lecture "Ar i 

Franklin Matthews] If m York S^* ^ thc A "^tic F| cet „ 
to-«. Semester Examinations 
at, Sophomores entertained by Miss Bowman 
^7. Piano Recital by Emfl Liebling 
2. Mendelssohn Trio. 
io. Illustrated Lecture, "Athens- Th„ t> • , 

Hall Raymond. ' The Rcvival of Hellenism," Jeromc 

ii. Valentine Parties Senior* n«^ c i 

* 1 Mm*. Club Play.TL ££*"**■ **■■ -« hfa.. 
». Vocal and Piano Recital, Mr. Thomas n r, . », 

g£~ Mi, B,a„ c „a S^TJa^^X^ 

"• jr^^-^-v^a,^,^ 

*$• Washington "Prom." 

26. Recital by Music Faculty. 

io. Illustrated Lecture, "R ome ; The Renaissance of <Mf r 

Jerome Hall Raymond. "usance of Self-Government," 

so. Pupil's Recital (Voice, Piano, Elocution) 
7- Dramatic Reading, Dr. Edward A Ott 
io. Piano Recital, Misses Kersey and Engelbrecht 

io. Recital by Music Faculty 

i7. Pupils' Recital (Voice, Piano, Violin, Elocution). 

24- Oratory Recital (Play), 

5- Recital, Emil Liebling 

15' Redtal^f^ W S d SeCger CEi ° CUti0n) > Ve£ta M «*> (Piano) 
*5- Kecital, Stephen Phillips' "Herod" bv P™»,u«+ tt \ 

Southwick, Boston. 7 Presidfint Henr * ^wrence 

£" Seta! p G 1 a 1 r aUra W ° 1Z <V0iCe) ' Elva WiUard CKa»o). 
29. Medal Recital, Jeanne M, Boyd (Piano) 

4- Baccalaureate Sunday. 

5- Commencement Recital. 
6. Reunion Day. 

7- Commencement. 



$5 



Qmtemlw mm an* Atututtfei, 
Have you remembered the Academy in your will p n . 
except Mrs. Shimer's estate and its income from mmi TT D ° resourc ^ 

bequest: lroni P u P lis - Use this form for 

FORM OF LEGACY 
I also give and bequeath to T„ E Frances SmrES 

. ( - The u «vE«sitv of Chicago 

specified ib the Act of Incorporation. And I hereby direct *«™ ^ PUrP0Se3 * ** ^^ « 
to the Treasurer of said Academy, taking hb receipt therefor w!Z "^ l ° W "« s "« 
after my decease. r - month* 

FORM OF A DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE] i 
I also give, bequeath, and devise to Tfc* F^ NC ,s Sn lifER AcuB|YOf - „ 
Calico one certain lot of land with the buiMm« ^ 7 ^ EMY 0F ^^ Usivsrsitv op 

—ess aad PartfcuIarity) t0 bc held :^^tiLt n d di r r deKribe the ^ - 

forever, for the purposes specified in the Act of Jncorpo ration. ^ "" ^"^ "* M9 * M 

Write the Dean concerning annuities, 
burgh, Philaddpito CW ^cou„.an.3 of New York, Pitts .